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tanlaw2006
Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

What about the engineered floating hardwood. I thought those were the real thing?

harmonSmith
Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

I will recommend tiles for kitchen. Hardwood Flooring is not as resistant to scratches and ‘wear and tear' than harder surfaces like laminate floors for and therefore does not cope as well with heavy foot traffic, kids, and pets.
I have heard one too many reports of wood floors damaged by DW malfunction to even consider wood in the kitchen.
Maintenance of these floors can be time consuming and at times inconvenient. you must not move furniture along its surface and you must place matsin your kitchen near sinks and dishwashers to prevent spills. Ciciliot

Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

That brings to mind my brother and his wife who had a dishwasher accident that flooded their kitchen while they were away.

Their hardwood floor was ruined, but they decided to replace it with new hardwood because they loved the warmth and ease of care.

They also took my advice and installed a pan with a drain under their dishwasher.

Tile does not provide warmth and ease of care. The only time I recommend tile in my projects here in the San Francisco Bay Area is when I am dealing with a home built on a concrete slab. Then it makes sense. Using tile here, on wood frame construction, with our earthquakes, doesn't make sense at all.

Peggy

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

Well lets see, our hard wood kitchen floor has been down since about 1860, the last time it was refinished was about 15 years ago and it still looks good. We have pets in the house. It's vacuumed every other day and damp moped a couple of times a week or when there is a spill. That's about half the time and work that it takes to maintain the tile floor in our sun room . OK, we don't have a dish washer.
Jack

Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

I LOVE it!

Jack, you have touched on every point that makes hardwood the greatest kitchen floor.

Thank you!

Then, if you add how it helps rooms to flow together in small homes, and the warm look and feel, you can see why I am such a strong proponent.

Most of the kitchens I do, in the San Francisco Bay Area for middle class clients, are in homes where we are opening up the kitchen to adjacent spaces to make the entire home more livable.

Most of those homes already have hardwood flooring in the rest of the house. It just makes sense to carry the hardwood into the new, opened up, kitchen too.

Peggy

NEC
Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

Leaves me wondering if Jack will stop by this weekend to install hardwood floors in my kitchen..... Oh, and do the dishes as well since he will need to pull the dishwasher to install them..

What do you say Jack?

There are a couple of nice motels you can stay in within just a few minutes.

Oh, I have no problem supplying the materials. Not to worry...

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

Sorry NEC, have to stay home and do the dishes here.
Jack

NEC
Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

Ahhhhhhhhh! Shucks!
LOL

Timothy Miller
Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

Howdy, having worked numerous damaged hardwood floor claims .... small water leaks from dishwashers or ice maker lines to the refrig or pet oopsees, even a spilled glass of water that went unnoticed. Hardwood floors not in bathrooms why is that? Because so many other flooring types will withstand water damage not flooding- some withstand flooding quite well. So i will never have hard wood floors in a kitchen. Nor floating laminate floors that also warp quite easily when water introduced. But that is just me.

Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

You are absolutely right, Timothy, that hardwood and water are not good bedfellows.

However, the smoothness, warmth, repairability and cleanability of hardwood flooring over many years of use still make it my top recommendation for my clients' kitchens.

You can always buy a moisture sensor and place it under the dishwasher and sink if you are concerned about sneaky leaks.

No kitchen flooring is perfect. They all have their drawbacks: Vinyl has embossing that catches grime and it's not repairable. Linoleum needs to be waxed and periodically stripped. Laminates are easily damaged and not repairable. Stones are cold, and hard on the back and legs.

Hardwood can be the best of them all with good care and periodical renewal of the finish in traffic areas...AND maintaining your plumbing:D

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