4 posts / 0 new
Last post
todde
GFI Daisychain

Ok, I know this is not a new question. I am having to redo some old wiring in my basement. There are several outlets in series and I thought that you can protect them if you install a single GFI at the first outlet, correct?

If so, how many regular outlets can you have downstream?

I plan on placing double outlets at each location, so there will be a total of 6 duplex recepticals and will be on a 20 amp breaker.

Could I just install a 20 amp GFI breaker and be done with it all (install all regular 20 amp outlets)

canuk
Re: GFI Daisychain
todde wrote:

Ok, I know this is not a new question. I am having to redo some old wiring in my basement. There are several outlets in series and I thought that you can protect them if you install a single GFI at the first outlet, correct?

Just to be clear --- receptacles are wired in a parallel configuration and not in series.
Yes, if the GFCI is first in the circuit and all down stream recetacles wired to the *load* side will be GFCI protected .

Quote:

If so, how many regular outlets can you have downstream?

As many is allowed by code.

Quote:

I plan on placing double outlets at each location, so there will be a total of 6 duplex recepticals and will be on a 20 amp breaker.

: MM_openBrWindow('ibcGetAttachment.jsp?cItemId=nMHZ.OB8D.J.BDT1YNK3Wg&label=IBE&appName=IBE&sitex=10026:22372:US','Product','width=345,height=345,menubar=1')" target="_blank">
6 duplex ( like what is pictured ) should be just fine.
Curious though --- do you need a 20 amp circuit rather than a 15 amp?

Quote:

Could I just install a 20 amp GFI breaker and be done with it all (install all regular 20 amp outlets)

Yes , it would be more expensive than using the GFCI receptacle as discussed above.

ZZZ
Re: GFI Daisychain

Yes, you can do that as Canuk said, the 15 amp circuit is usually sufficient, and a GFI receptacle is the cheaper route. The amount of downstream receptacles depends on the feed through amperage stated on the GFI receptacle. You can figure on 10 receptacles if it is 15 amps and 13 if it is 20 amps, as a rule of thumb.

Re: GFI Daisychain

I agree with all the replies above but would like to add a few comments.

If using a GFCI receptacle to protect many other receptacles be sure to locate the GFCI receptacle where is readily accessible (2011 Code) and won't be covered up by boxes etc. It must also be the first receptacle feed from the panel. So, if the existing wiring has a junction box which feeds in several directions, you may be better off with a GFCI breaker.

If there is several hundred feet of wire on the circuit or one of the protected receptacles is in a wet or damp location (outside)you may have a problem with nuisance tripping, since the combined leakage current may exceed the 6 ma. GFCI limit.
If this occurs, install separate GFCI receptacles at each location.

In a basement, if the existing wiring you will be adding is #12
(20A) you can add a 20A (feed-thru rating) GFCI receptacle and standard 15A receptacles everywhere else.

Maurice Turgeon, thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.