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bp21901
Re: GFCI- W/Light Switch

Studying the diagrams it looks like you have two wires coming off the unit labeled "switch leads"? Is that correct? I believe the two "non-hot" black wires (assuming these are indeed going to the light) would need to be connected separately to these two leads. As stated earlier by others the black hot lead would go to the "line" brass screw and the white lead would go to the "line" silver screw. The other two "load" screws are there if you wanted to power other receptacles and have them also protected by the GFCI. From what I understand you are not powering other receptacles so these would not be used.

Before doing this, it would be good if you could verify the two non-hot black wires you have at the switch box are actually going to the light as we are assuming. You can do this with a cheap multimeter because you will need to be able to read voltage (to verify the wires are not hot)as well as resistance. Can you remove the light fixture to get to its wiring? Hopefully you will see two black wires like you have at the switch box.

If so, shut off the power for this circuit and then double check the wires you think are going to the light for any voltage using the multimeter. Check at both the light fixture and the switch/receptacle box to make sure there is NO voltage. Then wire nut the black wires together at the light fixture and use your multimeter set to resistance at the switch box across the two black wires there. If these are the same wires then you will have a reading of 0 ohms. If they are not the same wires then you will have infinite resistance (whatever character your multimeter uses to represent this).

Once you verify they are the wires we are assuming then connect the light fixture back the way it was and wire the switch box as I described above.

By the way, before you even install your switch unit (no wires connected to it at all) you can verify the wires coming off your unit are the switch leads. Do this by connecting your multimeter (resistance setting) leads to them and flipping the switch. The resistance should flip from 0 to infinity.

Hope this helps.

canuk
Re: GFCI- W/Light Switch

bp21901...

Like you said it's unknown as to the wiring situation for the OP.

It is curious though ... one would think the lights would go the "load" connections. With one wire being the neutral for the lights which would go to the "load" silver screw. The one switch lead would go to the "load" brass screw to supply power to the switch and the other switch lead would connect with the remaining wire with a wire nut then supplying power to the lights with the switch on. I believe the switch is a single pole /single throw configuration which usually doesn't have two outputs.

If another receptacle was to be used as well likely pig tails would connect to the load screws and the taps would come off the pig tails.

I'm guessing on this one since I'm not familiar with this particular combination unit.

Your test recommendations are good ones.

bp21901
Re: GFCI- W/Light Switch

Canuk....
I have never used a combo switch / GFCI unit either so I am guessing also, but it is easy enough to verify with a meter. But the "switch leads" description on the carton for the two leads makes me think that is what goes to the light fixture wires. I have always seen the "load" term on GFCI's used for the feed to the next protected outlet and thought it was the same on this one.

OP.....
Which screws / leads are controlled by the switch can be easily verified using an ohm meter before it is wired up. It would probably be a good idea to do that anyway since the description on the carton is not too clear. you could also verify the "line" - "load" screws are tied together (brass to brass & silver to silver).

canuk
Re: GFCI- W/Light Switch

bp21901...

I think I know what you're saying.
The two black wires are the hots for each light. Then it would seem the neutral is somewhere else.

Then the hot supply for the switch would have to be tied internally of the GFCI combo ?

Quote:

Right now the GFCI is wired with the hot wire and the vanilla colored wire wired together around the brass top screw, the remaining two black wires are wound around the silver screw on the other side on top.

Here's what confuses me ... this would be a dead short which would blow a fuse or circuit breaker. :confused:

I'm thinking there is confusion as to what wire is what... it seems the "line" black hot is tied with one of the blacks to the lights and the white neutral tied with the other black at the "load" screw ...though they are on the wrong colored screws.

Quote:

It's not grounded yet. But the lights work manually

It sort of seems this would be the same as tying them together with wire nuts and getting the same results. This is what leads me to think that one wire is neutral and one wire is hot for the lights.

Going by the information provided if those other black wires are the hot feeds to the lights and the neutral was tied somewhere else then the wiring configuration that was originally done would only result in one light turning on manually... the one tied to the line hot ( black ) at the "load" screw.

Are we having fun?

Cheers.:)

JLMCDANIEL
Re: GFCI- W/Light Switch

I'm guessing this is the way they had it wired to get the lights working.
Jack

Attachment: 
sabo4545
Re: GFCI- W/Light Switch

OK here is another thought and not having the instructions makes this just a guess.

Normally a switch has the hot connected to one brass screw and the other black wire going to the light connected to the other brass screw. The Neutral does not connect to the switch and just bypasses to the light.

My guess is that the GFCI / Switch acts as two completely separate objects. Therefore you would need to connect the (Hot Black Wire with a Pigtail and one of the Switch lead wires) Then connect the pigtail wire to the Brass Line Screw on the GFCI. Now the GFCI and one side of the switch would be hot.

Next connect the other switch lead wire to one of the black wires going to the light.

Now connect the (neutral wire with a pigtail and the other black wire going to the light) Then connect the neutral pigtail to the silver line screw on the GFCI.

As far as the Ground if you have a metal box it is hopefully grounded by an armored cable coming from the main panel. If it is you should be able to attach a ground wire to the box and to the GFCI. If the box is not grounded you will need to run a ground wire to get the GFCI to actually perform as a GFCI.

Again I do not know what the instructions say but this is my guess as to what is going on. Hope this helps out.

canuk
Re: GFCI- W/Light Switch

Yep ... I think we agree the light switch and receptacle are two separate items. In order for the lights to be part of the GFCI circuit should be hot wired to the load of the receptacle.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: GFCI- W/Light Switch

I think we lost NotBuilderBob.
Jack

bp21901
Re: GFCI- W/Light Switch

LOL....

Too much guessing going on, the OP ran full speed away!! :D

Well, I cant take the suspense any more...I will be stopping by a big box today for a couple odds & ends and I am going to buy one of these GFCI outlet / switch units to try out!

I'll report back tomorrow!!

canuk
Re: GFCI- W/Light Switch

Yep ... left high and dry.

bp21901... hope you have better luck I checked HD and they didn't have one to check out.;)

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