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marksplace
gate

I'm making a gate to fit the walk through door of a garage to keep the dogs in. I've been looking on the internet for ideas and the best looking are without a cross brace. I've been told that without a cross brace the gate will eventually sag. How do they keep their gates from sagging? Also this is for my neighbor and she wants it made out of the all white plastic door trim. Will this hold screws and not come loose in a couple years? Can I use glue? Will this work or should I talk her into wood? Thank you

dj1
Re: gate

All non metalic gates need bracing, espcially if they are wider than 30". The direction of the brace is determined by which way the gate swings. For wide gates, a wheel can be attached to give it some support.

I'm not a big proponent of vinyl gates and fences, but if this is what she chooses, you have to insert a wood member inside the vinyl to which you can attach the screws.

In my experience, wood is a lot stronger, and redwood is my number 1 choice.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: gate

Solid vinyl "wood" is available and works like wood. I believe you could make a small gate stable enough without a cross brace if you screwed and glued the components.

Jack

A. Spruce
Re: gate
dj1 wrote:

All non metalic gates need bracing, espcially if they are wider than 30". The direction of the brace is determined by which way the gate swings.

:confused::confused:

Sorry, while I know what you're saying, this statement is not exactly correct. The brace, regardless of swing direction (left handed or right handed ), must go from the bottom hinge corner to the upper opposite corner. The compression of the gate trying to sag will be completely supported in this manner.

As far as gluing composites, this will work as long as you're using glues compatible with the materials. Wood glue won't last. Polyurethanes don't hold up too well either. As far as trying to build any gate without a cross brace, I personally think this is a foolish idea. While you might get it to look good for a while, it doesn't take long for the abuses of weather and sun to take their toll and cause fasteners to loosen, glues to fail, and things to sag.

There is a bit of a trick you could use to conceal the brace. build the gate with two finished surfaces that sandwich the cross brace in the center. Use a filler on the latch edge of the gate and you can install a standard handset/deadbolt, or any other hardware you like.

jkirk
Re: gate

spruce is correct about the location of the brace, its the same engineering concept regarding location of hinges on a regular door

top hinge being 7" from the top and the bottom hinge being 11" from the bottom. this allows for better weight transfer so the door doesnt pull away (sag) from the jamb.

i always do the internal brace on gate doors, i simply get the box built first then square it. from there i scribe the brace stock by laying it over the door frame. this gives the angles to cut the brace on each end.. from there its screwed in place (no glue used) . glue loses its hold when used for exterior purposes. the constant wetting and drying combined with expansion and contraction breaks down the glue and the bond. from there i install fence boards on both sides which keep the look of the fence an hides the brace. if you dont want the fence boards directly on the face but still want to keep the brace it will require building the frame on its flat (1 1/2"" frame then chasing around it with 2x4 as normal. this way the fence boards can be set inside the full width frame

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: gate

These gates were made with pegged mortise and tenon joinery, no x-bracing, and they do not sag.

'course, they aren't dog gates, either. ;)
Casey

jkirk
Re: gate

thats some advanced carpentry going into that gate though casey, i think the original poster is talking about a pt gate

Fencepost
Re: gate

If you use a solid vinyl panel (you can get vinyl fence panels) between the rails and stiles, you probably could make a reasonably sturdy gate without diagonal bracing. But such a gate may not provide the desired effect.

If you do not want a solid gate, you may be able to use vinyl lattice as a panel. Vinyl lattice is a one-piece molding so there won't be any movement between the "slats". In effect this would be a whole bunch of cross braces. :cool:

Bobby Dawg
Re: gate
marksplace wrote:

I'm making a gate to fit the walk through door of a garage to keep the dogs in. I've been looking on the internet for ideas and the best looking are without a cross brace. I've been told that without a cross brace the gate will eventually sag. How do they keep their gates from sagging? Also this is for my neighbor and she wants it made out of the all white plastic door trim. Will this hold screws and not come loose in a couple years? Can I use glue? Will this work or should I talk her into wood? Thank you

Plastic door trim is designed for non-structural applications. It is designed for decorative purposes only.

Brad
Re: gate
Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

These gates were made with pegged mortise and tenon joinery, no x-bracing, and they do not sag.

'course, they aren't dog gates, either. ;)
Casey

nice gates!

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