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gizzygone
Re: French drain necessary?

So has anybody done the work themselves?

A. Spruce
Re: French drain necessary?

Install a French drain, water proof a basement, or install an interior basement drain?

Mastercarpentry
Re: French drain necessary?
A. Spruce wrote:

Install a French drain, water proof a basement, or install an interior basement drain?

Yes, yes, and yes- many, several, and a few. One of the latter was behind a set-back wood framed wall where a partial excavation was done, and it was only done for 'insurance' in case any water made it past the foundation which was actually higher than the new basement floor level. The other few were cases where either the exterior waterproofing was inadequate and the owner decided that they could not afford to do the thing right or where basement floor slab edge leakage was occurring due to saturated soil conditions/high water table. You can't fix house siting issues with a french drain and some lots simply shouldn't have a basement involved :p

Phil

gizzygone
Re: French drain necessary?
A. Spruce wrote:

Install a French drain, water proof a basement, or install an interior basement drain?

Interior waterproofing with an interior French drain. It seems labor intensive but not difficult.

But the more I research, the more it seems I should be excavating the front of my house.....

A. Spruce
Re: French drain necessary?
gizzygone wrote:

Interior waterproofing with an interior French drain. It seems labor intensive but not difficult.

But the more I research, the more it seems I should be excavating the front of my house.....

I agree with Mastercarpentry, it's better to stop the water outside the house first, an interior drainage system should be considered a backup, not a cure. And personally, digging dirt is a heck of a lot easier than messing around with cement basement walls and slabs. The plus side is that you get to use machinery! :D

The first thing you should do is make sure the ground near the house slopes away from the house, and that downspouts terminate at least 3' from the house. The easy way to deal with downspouts is to use corrugated drain tubing (solid, not perforated ) during the wet season.

gizzygone
Re: French drain necessary?
A. Spruce wrote:

I agree with Mastercarpentry, it's better to stop the water outside the house first, an interior drainage system should be considered a backup, not a cure. And personally, digging dirt is a heck of a lot easier than messing around with cement basement walls and slabs. The plus side is that you get to use machinery! :D

The first thing you should do is make sure the ground near the house slopes away from the house, and that downspouts terminate at least 3' from the house. The easy way to deal with downspouts is to use corrugated drain tubing (solid, not perforated ) during the wet season.

It is the correct way, but I'm guessing way more involved.

Plus, there are plenty of obstacles in the way: water main, gas and sewer lines. Not to mention ripping up a walkway and bushes.

What really tempts me about the interior system is the fact that I can control all 4 walls: the exterior had a garage attached on the left side, a chimney on the right side, and a 20 foot deck attached to the rear.

My leaking is only on the front, but the salesman said water can start any time in the life of a house. And investing the money for the whole basement seems like the best financial investment...

But this is just me thinking out loud

A. Spruce
Re: French drain necessary?
gizzygone wrote:

but the salesman said . . .

This is probably the single worst place for helpful advice. 90% of sales staff have an invested interest in selling you whatever their wares are, so they're going to tell you whatever YOU need to hear to make you buy their goods. I would recommend consulting with a few contractors about both interior and exterior systems, cost involved, life disruption, etc. If it were me, I'd be dealing with the outside first.

You don't necessarily have to tear out the walkway to install the F.D., you can tunnel under it, or remove a small section to gain access. Odds are, if the area is covered in concrete (driveway, garage, patio, etc. ), then the likelihood that your water issues are coming from there are slim.

gizzygone
Re: French drain necessary?
A. Spruce wrote:

This is probably the single worst place for helpful advice. 90% of sales staff have an invested interest in selling you whatever their wares are, so they're going to tell you whatever YOU need to hear to make you buy their goods. I would recommend consulting with a few contractors about both interior and exterior systems, cost involved, life disruption, etc. If it were me, I'd be dealing with the outside first.

You don't necessarily have to tear out the walkway to install the F.D., you can tunnel under it, or remove a small section to gain access. Odds are, if the area is covered in concrete (driveway, garage, patio, etc. ), then the likelihood that your water issues are coming from there are slim.

I certainly agree. That's most of the reason I'm turning to forums. What companies were pushing all make sense, but at the end of the day, I don't know enough about my problem to make a decision. I want to hear from you all (who have been very helpful!! Thanks!) to maybe hear my options. Not only that, but I'm getting references to read and go by.

I'm the kind of person who likes to do things right the first time, and that usually means tons of research on my part. My problem, though, is there isn't any real black and white answer to the issue. There's far too many variables.

But the more I probe, it seems the more I learn!

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