Home>Discussions>INTERIORS>Molding & Carpentry>finding true dimensional joists or ripping down lumber
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bobphoto
finding true dimensional joists or ripping down lumber

OK..I've searched and searched and cannot find a solution or answer. I'm replacing approx 8 2x8 (true dimension 1880) joists that span 12' in the basement that support the first floor in a balloon framed home. The joists are attached to a 10x10 main beam and the other ends rest directly on the fieldstone foundation. I cannot find true dimension lumber for anywhere near reasonable pricing. The original joists sit back about a foot onto the foundation to support the upstairs floor so notching a 2x10 wouldn't work. Can I purchase 2x10's and cut them down to a true 8 inches? If not where would you recommend finding the proper lumber?

dj1
Re: finding true dimensional joists or ripping down lumber

If you replace 2x8 joists with 1-1/2x7-1/2 you will have 1/2" gaps. You can shim them with pieces of 1/2" plywood, cut to size.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: finding true dimensional joists or ripping down lumber

To match the greater strength of the old wider timber, use LVL's and rip them to the exact height. Be prepared to replace your ripping blade.
Casey

function
Re: finding true dimensional joists or ripping down lumber

Do you need to replace? I plan on sistering, myself.

Fencepost
Re: finding true dimensional joists or ripping down lumber

Find a local sawmill. They can custom cut lumber for you. Be sure to let them know what you're doing, so they can select the proper logs and orient the cuts to produce material suitable for your application.

jkirk
Re: finding true dimensional joists or ripping down lumber

if its being inspected it has to have engineers stamps on it otherwise it will fail

Fencepost
Re: finding true dimensional joists or ripping down lumber
jkirk wrote:

if its being inspected it has to have engineers stamps on it otherwise it will fail

Another reason to let the sawmill know exactly what you're doing. They may have access to a lumber grader who will inspect and stamp the lumber for you so it will pass inspection.

(Not sure about where jkirk lives, but in the Pacific NW the lumber is certified by lumber graders, not engineers.)

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