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Diane
Faux files

My tiny old kitchen has "faux" tiling for backsplash and parts of the walls. It's actually pretty sturdy still and in good condition. It just looks - well, fake. I'm redoing my kitchen in a retiree's budget and do not want to remove this stuff as there's enough of it to mean a lot of hard work. It's behind the fridge, for example. I'm starting to think outside the box. Covering it with burlap sprayed with layers of acrylic or something like that has crossed my mind. I also have a spot that's only about 3 inches high behind the sink and under the only window. I probably ought to do the same thing there - or maybe not? Ideas??

MLB Construction
Re: Faux files

how about pressed tin tiles. a very easy do it yourself project and you can put it over almost anything. if you like that look......and they can be painted if you don't like the colors they come in

Jeanne
Re: Faux files

Personally, I love beadboard. If you take the fake tiles down and the wall is damaged, the bead board will cover it. I don’t know if you could just put the beadboard over the tiles. Beadboard comes in panels and is not very expensive. However, I am a lady like you and not good at cutting large panels so I had a carpenter install it for me. It was a small job and not too expensive. I did the sanding, priming and painting myself.

Diane
Re: Faux files

Perhaps I need to clarify. This fake tiling is in single sheets of what seems to be as strong as masonite. It is BEHiND cabinetry and my refrigerator, in some places floor to ceiling. Tearing it out would be a nightmare and run up a lot more expense than I can afford simply on an aesthetic.

It was suggested to me that perhaps I could smear mud(spackle) over it all, smooth it our than do it again. that is, make it "faux" plaster. I could see this at least for the large pieces. If I did this for the backslashes, could I do something like mount those small 1-inch square tiles on sheets? (I'm sure there's a name for them).

Basically, I'm thinking what can I do OVER it. It is strong and probably behind it is very old plaster.

Jeanne
Re: Faux files

Maybe one of the construction guys knows what the panels are made of and how best to deal with them. For example, would the mud or spackle stick, or fall off? Are the panels painted? Are they glued to the wall? Do you know how old they are? They may have been put up to cover up problems with the plaster wall.

There are some tutorials on line and maybe on Youtube about hanging wallpaper over paneling. There are wallpaper products that look like textured drywall, beadboard, stucco and some other styles. They are also washable and paintable. The paneling needs to be primed and prepped properly. I’ve never done it.

If the faux tile panels can be nailed or screwed through, then it might be possible to put another type of panel over it – check ****** at the home centers to see the different styles. Some look like beadboard. There are 8ft long panels so they can go from floor to ceiling unless your ceiling is higher then 8 ft.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Faux files

Hi,
You have a factory-finished masonite product; one well-known brand was Abitibi Board. The enamel was extremely durable and waterproof. Maybe consider just repainting with oil enamel (or an emulsion paint like Ben Moore "Advance" line)
Other than that, to eliminate the texture it would be better to go over with a wallpaper (after cleaning, sanding and priming so the paste can stick) such as a heavy textured/patterned paper like Anaglypta (or Supaglypta) or maybe a grass cloth or just smooth "liner paper".
Casey

Jeanne
Re: Faux files

Also, if you want to tile the back splash part, go to the John Bridge Tile forum where you can easily post a picture and get some expert advice on if it is possible to tile over the faux tiles and how to best do that.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Faux files

What you've got is "Marlite" or "Abitibi" board. This is essentially masonite with a plastic coating and a pattern pressed onto the face and edges. You needn't pull the cabinets to get rid of the backsplash part, just cut it where it meets the countertop. Multiple deep scores with a sharp knife will allow it to 'snap' where you cut it or you can use a 'multimaster' type tool. Or you can apply a tile backer etc. right over it. It is not suited to tile over directly- painting is the best option if you are going to leave it intact. It won't hold mud or filler well as the surface is slick, so I wouldn't skim it with anything.

Or you can apply another layer of a similar material over it, being sure to caulk well as this stuff hates moisture getting into the backing. Do be aware that this is normally glued onto the wall, so when you pull it off you will probably pull some paper facing off the sheetrock underneath, but that's usually not a tough fix- just skim with mud and sand. If you can stand the 'industrial' look, sanding it and applying stainless sheet metal or metal tiles will work, or you can use FRP. Personally I'd take it off before doing anything else.

Phil

Diane
Re: Faux files
Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

Hi,
You have a factory-finished masonite product; one well-known brand was Abitibi Board. The enamel was extremely durable and waterproof. Maybe consider just repainting with oil enamel (or an emulsion paint like Ben Moore "Advance" line)
Other than that, to eliminate the texture it would be better to go over with a wallpaper (after cleaning, sanding and priming so the paste can stick) such as a heavy textured/patterned paper like Anaglypta (or Supaglypta) or maybe a grass cloth or just smooth "liner paper".
Casey

Thanks, Casey. I'm am grateful that you recognize exactly what it is that I'm talking about. It makes it easier to find a solution that way. If I were to paint it, what about the "grout" lines? It would be a nightmare to try to either cover them all with something to paint or to repaint them after painting the "tiles". Would it look all right if it were just a single color??

Diane
Re: Faux files
Mastercarpentry wrote:

What you've got is "Marlite" or "Abitibi" board. This is essentially masonite with a plastic coating and a pattern pressed onto the face and edges. You needn't pull the cabinets to get rid of the backsplash part, just cut it where it meets the countertop. Multiple deep scores with a sharp knife will allow it to 'snap' where you cut it or you can use a 'multimaster' type tool. Or you can apply a tile backer etc. right over it. It is not suited to tile over directly- painting is the best option if you are going to leave it intact. It won't hold mud or filler well as the surface is slick, so I wouldn't skim it with anything.

Or you can apply another layer of a similar material over it, being sure to caulk well as this stuff hates moisture getting into the backing. Do be aware that this is normally glued onto the wall, so when you pull it off you will probably pull some paper facing off the sheetrock underneath, but that's usually not a tough fix- just skim with mud and sand. If you can stand the 'industrial' look, sanding it and applying stainless sheet metal or metal tiles will work, or you can use FRP. Personally I'd take it off before doing anything else.

Phil

Thanks, Phil. Taking it off is way more work than I want to get into, especially since behind it may well be old plaster. There isn't much for sheetrock in this house. It's looking like painting is the best solution. What would you think of a texture paint in the backsplash area? I am leery of them overall, because they are hard to paint once they get dirty or dull.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Faux files

My personal choice for paint there would be a gloss or semi-gloss oil based enamel. It's durable, easily cleanable, and more water-resistant than latex products. I'd avoid anything textured as it will be hard to clean. If you are motivated enough and have the time, you can also use multiple colors and paint the fake grout lines back in, making it look more like a custom tile job :cool: Lotsa detailed work in that but maybe best look you can get out of it on the cheap! If you do paint, scuff-sand wherever it's shiny so the paint will bond, and prime with original Kilz or Zinnser 1-2-3.

Phil

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