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dj1
Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
dj1

After a Crazy summer, with a capital C, things are cooling down around here. We had days over 110 F like never before - so many of them. One weekend we were in Vegas - it was 125 F. Still the town was packed.

- We still have tomatoes, the hardiest type is the cherry tomato.
- We still have string beans, giving a foot long beans.
- This summer we tried Bitter Melon - a squash type green veggie that looks like a cuke with wrinkles, and believed to be a natural cure for blood sugar. The supply at the stores was erratic, so my wife dried out some seeds and within a month we had the growing beautifully.
- Our corn plants, that grew up to over 7' tall were a failure. Never gave the anticipated corn...
- Our Baby Choi were too tempting for the insects, we had to harvest them immediately (too small).
- Our green onions keep on growing from the same bulbs, continuously. Very dependable.
- Our Bell peppers keep failing - this must be the wrong soil for them in the back yard, Any advice?
- We managed to grow 3 soccer ball size pumpkins, just in time for treat o trick night.

That's all folks.

ed21
Re: Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
ed21

My cherry tomatoes got frosted the other night. :(
I never have many issues with peppers. I like to add crab or lobster compost to the soil. It isn't easy to find and I never tried to make my own. Probably smelly to make. ;) good stuff for tomatoes too. Lots of calcium helps prevent blossom end rot.
I'm not sure bell peppers like excessive heat.

A. Spruce
Re: Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
A. Spruce

Our garden hasn't done so well the last few years, which is somewhat odd, we had nothing but lifeless hard pan clay that I amended with yards and yards of horse poo, tilled deep, there's actually some nutrients in the ground now. I think that it's mostly a differing opinion on watering, someone in the household likes to over water, then when the plants all turn yellow/brown, she adds more water because they're not getting enough water . . . :rolleyes: I've actually completely stepped away from it to let the "expert" do it her way.

When we did have good production, we had the best success with peppers when planted in mounds of three and then use a tomato cage to keep them upright. Until the over watering occurred, we had bumper crops, no matter what variety of pepper it was.

Tomato plants now grow to well over 6' tall, problem is, they don't produce much or quit setting fruit after the first few appear. The only thing to force us out of house and home are those damn zucchini and crook neck squash, I don't even like zucchini or crook neck squash! Cukes the past few years get taken over by aphids, long beans a few years ago were taken over by red spider mites, chives and green onions get taken over by black aphids, which again is strange, because this property was built on an ant hill and ants are supposed to love aphids . . . :rolleyes:

ed21
Re: Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
ed21

The biggest issue I've had the last few years are deer eating my tomato plants. The plants don't seem to recover after being nibbled down a foot or two.

A. Spruce
Re: Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
A. Spruce
ed21 wrote:

The biggest issue I've had the last few years are deer eating my tomato plants. The plants don't seem to recover after being nibbled down a foot or two.

The cure for that is a nice venison dinner, with fresh tomato sauce! :cool::p

dj1
Re: Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
dj1

It ain't easy growing organic vegetables.

To protect against deer -
- can you cover the plants with nets?
- get a barking dog (which will keep you up all night long).
- spread predator scent around the yard?
- build a hot house?

A. Spruce
Re: Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
A. Spruce
dj1 wrote:

It ain't easy growing organic vegetables.

To protect against deer -
- can you cover the plants with nets?
- get a barking dog (which will keep you up all night long).
- spread predator scent around the yard?
- build a hot house?

I've heard that urinating around the perimeter of the garden will deter them as well, easy enough for us guys, we're used to writing our names in the snow, women folk, however, may have a little rougher time with it.

dj1
Re: Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
dj1

Spruce, Women what ?!?

A. Spruce
Re: Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
A. Spruce
dj1 wrote:

Spruce, Women what ?!?

If'n I has ta essplain what a womens is, maybe dey ain't fer you!:confused::D

keith3267
Re: Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
keith3267

Women and shy men with nosey neighbors can always pee in a jar and the use it in a garden sprayer to distribute it around the perimeter of the garden.

Oddly enough, my yard gets visited by deer frequently but they never bother the tomato plants. Must be the apples, pears, figs and peaches.

keith3267
Re: Fall 2015 Vegetable Garden Report
keith3267

I just finished closing out my garden for this year, or at least this phase of it. I have removed all the plants except the asparagus and put them in the compost piles. I have dug all the beds with a fork.

This spring, I got 10 trailer loads of horse manure (4 x 7 trailer with 16" walls) and made 10 beds. All are 22' long, 6 of them are 4' wide and 4 of them are 3' wide. The Asparagus occupies two of the 4' beds with a 4' bed between them for tomatoes.

I wasn't going to plant anything this year because I wanted the manure to settle down, but before you know it, just a few tomato plants turned into 20, then there were a few summer squash, some purple hull peas, some corn and some sweet potatoes.

Summer squash usually is good for about 6-8 weeks here before the squash bugs and vine borers do them in. This year, I put a 4" square of aluminum foil around the base of each plant and there was no borer damage. The squash bugs seemed to have taken a vacation too, I didn't see any until August. By that time I had had enough summer squash for dinner that I was pretty sick of it.

Very little corn germinated and it didn't grow very tall, but a got a couple good meals out of it. Only about a dozen plants germinated.

The purple hull peas did good. I only harvested a few of them, mainly I planted them to keep the weeds down and to help the manure to settle.

The tomatoes were funny this year. I like Brandywine and Sweet 100 tomatoes, but I try a few other heirloom verities each year too see if I might find one that does better. This year I tried Black Cherokee, Mortgage Lifter, Arkansas Traveller, and Mr Stripy. None worked out for me. I did some Beefsteak as well but all I got were small (2") tomatoes.

The Brandywine's started producing early, I got ripe tomatoes in late June, I usually have to wait until late July or August. Then disaster struck. Something caused the plants to wilt and die. I took a few suckers and stuck them in the ground in another row and they rotted and grew. Most of the Brandywine's in the main bed died, but a couple suckered from the base and survived. A couple of those started producing tomatoes in early Sept. The Cherokee Black ad the Mr Stripy did the same thing, but the fruit just wasn't as good as I expected.

None of the large fruited tomatoes were as big this year as they normally are, but the Brandywine came the closest. The Sweet 100's came through just like always making more tomatoes than I could eat. They have the best flavor anyway, they just don't make a good sandwich.

Now to collect as may shredded leaves as I can to cover the beds with so I can get of to an early start next spring.

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