Home>Discussions>DOORS & WINDOWS>Exterior front door casing damage by interior trim carpenter
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sahk1942
Exterior front door casing damage by interior trim carpenter

My front door had not closed properly in years -- it stuck in a couple different places, took a really heavy hand to open it, and was just plain out of alignment (the easiest way I can say it). My interior trim carpenter said he would fix it as he was there doing other projects in the house. He removed the interior door casing to add shims and align the jamb. While it appears he fixed it from the inside (the door doesn't stick and opens smoothly now), the exterior casing on the opposite side has now protruded out about 1/4 to 1/3 inch. The separation is on the handle set side only, both top and hinge side did not separate.

My question is how severe is this? Is it something that can be expected when he fixed the alignment and jamb? Can I simply caulk the exposed area and repaint it? Or do I need to do something more, like install new casing for the exterior side of the door?

Thank you all for your input! Seems like you fix one thing in an old house and it leads to two things breaking. :)

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Exterior front door casing damage by interior trim carpenter

I wonder if the shims he drove in from inside pushed the outside trim away.
Casey

MLB Construction
Re: Exterior front door casing damage by interior trim carpenter
Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

I wonder if the shims he drove in from inside pushed the outside trim away.
Casey

it looks like that's what happened or he purposely moved it out to get it level and plumb so it would operate properly. my guess would be to recase the exterior and you should be good to go.

dj1
Re: Exterior front door casing damage by interior trim carpenter

I'd remove the existing exterior casing and install new. And finish it correctly.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Exterior front door casing damage by interior trim carpenter

I would call the guy back to make it right or to explain to me why he took something that worked- albeit poorly- and made something else go wrong when he 'fixed' it. If he can't explain it, get a real carpenter out there (and be prepared to pay for their experience). Almost never do I have to change anything of the jamb to make a door work and stay working; it can almost always be done under the hinges or in the case of a sagging strike side by truing the top of the door and resetting the strike. You just have to know the right tricks to do this- unconventional but very workable ones! I've had just one call-back on a door I fixed in over 20 years and that was because the house was unstable and shifting with humidity changes in the soil. A new foundation pier in the right place fixed that and it's still working fine.

Phil

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