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tggringo
Electrical question

Need some advice.Last year I replaced the two outdoor light fixtures on my front door.My problem is no matter what type of bulb I use they burn out very quickly.What could be my problem/

Re: Electrical question

Have you tried CFL's?

Most incandescent lamps are only good for about 1000 hours. But, if you switch to 130 volt incandescent bulbs and they're only being fed 120 volts (normal to most houses) you will get many times the life, but less light output.

Maurice Turgeon, thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

MLBSF
Re: Electrical question

your fixture is rated for a certain sized (watt) light bulb. for instance, if the fixture is rated for a 60 watt bulb and you put in a 75 wat bulb, it will over heat and burn out very quickly.

Re: Electrical question

True, if a 75W bulb is installed in a fixture rated for only 60W the fixture life will possibly decrease.

I assume you're not talking about the replacing a 120 volt bulb with a 130 volt bulb. Doing so will actually reduce the heat in the fixture, which could actually prolong the life of the fixture and the lamp.

Maurice Turgeon, thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

sparky1
Re: Electrical question

you could be getting water in the fixture. have a loose connection with the socket.. If your not super fond of the fixtures id change em out with new ones

dennistonnate
Re: Electrical question

Is the bulb getting burned out or are they getting ratttled around and the filiamnet breaking?

keith3267
Re: Electrical question

Really need more information about the fixtures as there are a lot scenarios that can cause this problem, and as many solutions.

Do the fixtures have any extra features like "dawn to dusk" or motion sensors? Are they left on 24/7 or turned on and off a lot? How big are the bulbs (wattage) or what type of bulb, regular, CFL, candelabra?

Are there multiple bulbs in each fixture?

A lot of on/off activity shortens the life of the bulb, especially a CFL. 24/7 allows longer bulb life as measured in hours, but those hours go by a lot faster.

Heat build up is another bulb killer, both for incandescent and CFL, cold is a killer for CFL's as well, but they are second best for 24/7 operation. LED would be the best but at a high initial cost.

Bugs cause a problem in the summer, they get into the fixture and die. There carcasses reduce airflow around the base of the bulb and again, the bulb overheats.

My favorite bulb is a 25 watt bug light, no longer available. I have found a 40 watt bug light but I may have bought the last on of those. My fixtures are the type with dawn to dusk and motion sensors so CFLs and LEDs are not an option.

Any candidate for public office will have to agree to overturn the incandescent ban if they want my vote in the future, that was misguided legislation.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Electrical question

Vibration is a problem for lamps and newer cheap light fixtures are so thinly constructed that they easily vibrate. You can replace the fixture or try replacing the lamps with appliance bulbs.
Jack

GregoryR
Re: Electrical question

I am installing a ceiling medallion and have removed the existing chandlier. I will be moving the light fixture about 7 -10 inches. The wires on the original fixture will not be long enough to reach this new hole. Do I attach an additional one foot of wire on both white and black wires to reach the new hole, assuming they will be below the medallion when installed.
Is this the way to go or are there other solutions?

In addition, when I disconnected the wires from the existing light, one of the plug-in outlets in the same room as well as the plug-in outlet directly behind but in the adjoining room do not work after power restored. What happened. All other outlets in these two rooms work OK.

GregoryR
[email protected]

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Electrical question
GregoryR wrote:

I am installing a ceiling medallion and have removed the existing chandlier. I will be moving the light fixture about 7 -10 inches. The wires on the original fixture will not be long enough to reach this new hole. Do I attach an additional one foot of wire on both white and black wires to reach the new hole, assuming they will be below the medallion when installed.
Is this the way to go or are there other solutions?

In addition, when I disconnected the wires from the existing light, one of the plug-in outlets in the same room as well as the plug-in outlet directly behind but in the adjoining room do not work after power restored. What happened. All other outlets in these two rooms work OK.

GregoryR
[email protected]

All splices must be inside of J-boxes and accessable, if the cable is not long enough to reach the new location you will need to leave the out box in place and install a blank cover on it.
Jack

A. Spruce
Re: Electrical question
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

All splices must be inside of J-boxes and accessable, if the cable is not long enough to reach the new location you will need to leave the out box in place and install a blank cover on it.
Jack

Yes, the box MUST be accessible, but not necessarily from the surface, meaning that if there's access from the attic, you can pull the wires and box up into the attic to secure, then attach the extension to the new box location. If there's no access from the attic, then as Jack said, you'll have to put a blank cover over the existing box and install a second box where you want it.

As to the outlet problem, it could just be a coincidence that the outlet quit working at the same time the light was played with. Turn the breaker of to those outlets, carefully remove the outlets from the wall and make sure the wire connections are tight and intact. Reassemble the outlets, turn the breaker back on and check your work. If that didn't cure the problem, then backtrack your work with the light fixture and make sure you didn't change anything there. It's possible that the light/switch gets it's power from the outlet and something you've played with has changed that.

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