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gators
dropped molding

We have purchased a 1940 Colonial Revival. In the living room and dining room the molding is about 1-2" below the ceiling. It's too high to be a picture rail (I think) but it's driving my wonderful carpenter nuts. Does anyone know if houses were built this way and, if so, what is this trim called? We'd like to put crown molding in but don't want to change the heart of the house too much.

Dave357
Re: dropped molding

A picture rail is absolutely correct. In the olden days, it was taboo to drive a nail into a plastered wall to hang a picture. Instead, the picture rail was installed and pictures were hung from it via hooks & wires or cords. Some of the hooks that hung on the rail were quite decorative, and are still available.

Click here for an illustration & source of the hooks.

gators
Re: dropped molding

Dave, Thank you SO much for confirming my original guess. My carpenter thinks the picture rail molding emphasises any uneven places because he can see that some parts of the railing are closer to the ceiling than other places. We would like to keep the house as authenic as possible but I must admit the picture rail is not really attractive. Are there any solutions?

guruofhousing
Re: dropped molding
gators wrote:

We have purchased a 1940 Colonial Revival. In the living room and dining room the molding is about 1-2" below the ceiling. It's too high to be a picture rail (I think) but it's driving my wonderful carpenter nuts. Does anyone know if houses were built this way and, if so, what is this trim called? We'd like to put crown molding in but don't want to change the heart of the house too much.

Purposeful lowering for green friendly foam insulation you can place just behind the mold. This makes the function of insulation as part of the larger appearing mold. This aftermarket insulation is the most needed just inside of the houses'
greatest thermal conduits.

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