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mikem
Door Jamb

We have 5 1\4" door jambs! We bought a prehung door with a 4" jamb. How can we make this work?

sabo4545
Re: Door Jamb

I recently found myself in a similar situation. What I did was remove the stop molding that came on the door. Then I used some pine that I planed down to 1/2" thick so it didn't take up to much room in the opening and used this as the stop. I ripped it to a width so it would be the width of where the door would hit it for the stop to the finished plaster wall. Glued it and nailed it to the jambs and it worked great. Looks like a rabbeted jamb now instead of just having the cheap stop mold that comes on most pre-hung doors these days. Hope this helps you out.

Mike

KKelly
Re: Door Jamb

It's odd that you'd find 4" door jambs. Most, if not all, retail ready jambs are 4-9/16" or 6-9/16".

What you need is a "jamb extension". That's simply attaching a compatible piece of lumber, in a very secure manner, to the existing jamb (not on the hinge side) to widen the jamb. I like clear pine and would never use MDF or anything not real wood.

andrewk8
Re: Door Jamb
KKelly wrote:

Most, if not all, retail ready jambs are 4-9/16" or 6-9/16".

What you need is a "jamb extension". That's simply attaching a compatible piece of lumber, in a very secure manner, to the existing jamb (not on the hinge side) to widen the jamb.

What do you mean "not on the hinge side"? All 3 sides of pre-hung door jambs (hinge-side, latch side, and top piece) require extension pieces to make up the gap.

I also have a 5-1/4" wide door jamb. Is there a standard lumber size to make up the 4-9/16" to 5-1/4" gap that you can just cut-to-length? I only have basic tools (e.g. circular saw, drill); I don't have a table saw, router, planer, etc or any other "fancy" power tool to custom-cut pieces to fit.

A. Spruce
Re: Door Jamb
andrewk8 wrote:

What do you mean "not on the hinge side"? All 3 sides of pre-hung door jambs (hinge-side, latch side, and top piece) require extension pieces to make up the gap.

He means that the hinges stand proud of the jamb on the "door" side of the frame, that is to say, the side that the door is flush with the frame. You can't add extensions because the hinges will be in the way, add them to the open side of the frame.

andrewk8 wrote:

I also have a 5-1/4" wide door jamb. Is there a standard lumber size to make up the 4-9/16" to 5-1/4" gap that you can just cut-to-length? I only have basic tools (e.g. circular saw, drill); I don't have a table saw, router, planer, etc or any other "fancy" power tool to custom-cut pieces to fit.

Not a problem. You can use the circular saw to rip the strip you need. Purchase one jamb leg, found in the trim and molding department. Scribe a cut line on the material and cut it accurately and ever so slightly proud of the line. Glue and nail (or screw ) the strip to the jamb so that the visible surface is flush. Do this all the way around the jamb. When the glue has cured, sand the face and cut edge to be as smooth as possible. Install door as normal but do not nail through the extension piece or you'll likely break it. Install trim and caulk and any small irregularities in the extensions should disappear.

goldhiller
Re: Door Jamb

Or.......run down to a local custom cabinet/woodworking shop and have them make the pieces you need.

A. Spruce
Re: Door Jamb
goldhiller wrote:

Or.......run down to a local custom cabinet/woodworking shop and have them make the pieces you need.

Take the door with ya and they can install them too.:cool:

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