Home>Discussions>BATHROOMS>Did I completely mess up installing toilet flange on subfloor?
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ianmgull
Did I completely mess up installing toilet flange on subfloor?

I'm remodeling a bathroom. I installed a new PVC toilet flange and glued it using PVC glue. It is flush with the subfloor. After using half inch concrete board (and what will likely be another half inch of thinset and tile) I realize that the flange will likely be about an inch below the surface of the tile. How bad did I mess up? Anything I can do to fix the problem?

A. Spruce
Re: Did I completely mess up installing toilet flange on subfloor?

The flange needs to be flush with the surface of the finished floor. Thankfully, there are a few things you can do, the easiest will be to raise up what you've got, if you have the space and slack to do so, otherwise, install a slip fit flange. This type of flange has a rubber gasket on it and slides down inside the existing flange. You shim it to the required height and then screw it down firmly. I just had to install one of these and they work very nicely. Another option is a glue type flange, as long as you have not put a wax ring down first, this would work well.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Did I completely mess up installing toilet flange on subfloor?

There are also extension flanges such as the Oatey twist and fit, as well as HD SKU # 731163 which has a very nice stainless ring.

SaniSeal makes thick foam rings which replace the wax rings. They are available on Amazon.

(This would be a lot easier if I could post pics and links. Hint Hint)

MLBSF
Re: Did I completely mess up installing toilet flange on subfloor?

those are good ideas, only important point is that the flange should sit "on" the finished floor, not flush with the finished floor.

dj1
Re: Did I completely mess up installing toilet flange on subfloor?
MLBSF wrote:

those are good ideas, only important point is that the flange should sit "on" the finished floor, not flush with the finished floor.

I don't think that this is a requirement. I have many toilets (in rental homes) with flanges which don't even touch the finished floor (meaning, the finished floor is cut short of the flange), but most of them are flush.

A. Spruce
Re: Did I completely mess up installing toilet flange on subfloor?

All the tile setters I've had set the flange flush with the finished floor. For vinyl floors I've laid, anything flush to slightly proud of the surface works fine.

The thing is, if the flange is above the finished floor height, it crushes the wax ring too much, to the point it can fail. A flush flange is the right height for a standard wax ring.

I'm not trying to argue, we all have our tried and true methods, flush has always worked for me, proud flanges can be a bit of a pain to deal with.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Did I completely mess up installing toilet flange on subfloor?

I'm with A.Spruce. There has to be enough thickness in the way ring to maintain it's integrity- too thin and it splits. The mentioned fixes will work fine. Don't overtighten the flange-to-toilet bolts with a plastic flange. What I usuaslly do once the toilet is sitting atop the flange with the bolts alogned is to sit on the toilet to compress the wax, then tighten the bolts. That way you get a better feel for the torque (tightening) you're doing on them.

Phil

dj1
Re: Did I completely mess up installing toilet flange on subfloor?
Mastercarpentry wrote:

I'm with A.Spruce. There has to be enough thickness in the way ring to maintain it's integrity- too thin and it splits. The mentioned fixes will work fine. Don't overtighten the flange-to-toilet bolts with a plastic flange. What I usuaslly do once the toilet is sitting atop the flange with the bolts alogned is to sit on the toilet to compress the wax, then tighten the bolts. That way you get a better feel for the torque (tightening) you're doing on them.

Phil

Phil, I can't help it: you do have your pants on when you do your "test sitting", don't you? :D:confused::rolleyes:

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Did I completely mess up installing toilet flange on subfloor?

Whenever possible we use stainless steel flanges. The don't rust and are very hard to break when tightening the terlit bolts.

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