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BrettM
Deep well pump wont shut off

I have a 175' well with a submerseable pump. It will not build pressure above 28 psi. It will will hold at 28 psi, even if I manualy shut it off. Presure tank is at 28 PSI. New presure switch (30/50 psi)........ HELP PLEASE

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Deep well pump wont shut off

If it keeps suppling water but not above 28 lbs., I would say your pump is worn out and needs to be replaced.

Jack

carlcgland
Re: Deep well pump wont shut off

it could just be the impeller is worn on the pump, the pump works as you say, so the impeller would be something to check out. If the pump is working, maybe not to it's full power, then the pump as stated before. I'd check the impeller and pump bearings before I'd invest in a new pump.

ed21
Re: Deep well pump wont shut off

I would agree the pump's worn out. Is it over 20 years ols? Not a DIY. One of the costs for living in the ecountry and not having chlorine & floride in your drinking water.

perchinonlakeerie
Re: Deep well pump wont shut off

check the pressure tank first, if depressed you shouln not get water out of the tire valve, if there is water when depressed get a new tank. that is probally all that is wrong about $100 and an hour of your time at home depot or tractor supply

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Deep well pump wont shut off
perchinonlakeerie wrote:

check the pressure tank first, if depressed you shouln not get water out of the tire valve, if there is water when depressed get a new tank. that is probally all that is wrong about $100 and an hour of your time at home depot or tractor supply

The problem as described is not symptomatic of a water logged pressure tank.
Jack

shannonw
Re: Deep well pump wont shut off

This does not sound like a water logged tank. The symptoms would be different.

It sounds to me like one of three things has happened. I will start with cheapest and go to expensive.

1. If you have steel pipe in your well, it may have a small hole in it not allowing the pump to build pressure. Also may have a hole in a steel coupling. Another problem we are seeing is with pvc couplings being cracked. If you have steel pipe I would suggest replacing with pvc. It gives you so much better water quality and never goes bad.

2. The pump end is worn out. This could be from impellers being worn, bad bearings, or shaft twisted. The pump is made up of two main pieces, the pump and the motor. If the motor checks good it is up to you as to replace both components or to replace only the pump end. The pump end is roughly about half the price of both motor and pump. The pump can be rebuilt but by the time you buy the parts and pay labor to rebuild it, you can buy a new pump with a warrantee. You'd be hard pressed to find someone to warrantee a rebuilt pump. With a decent warrantee anyways.

3. This one is an expensive speculation. I don't think this is it but it is still a possibility. The pump is putting out only what the well is producing. If this is the case, the well would have to be drilled deeper. I only mention this because I don't know what part of the country you are in. 175 feet may be deep in your area. In the area I live in I can go an hour north and the wells range from 100 feet to 200 feet or I can go 30 minutes south and the wells range from 700 feet to 1500 feet. So again I don't know what is normal where you are.

Best wishes and hope the problem is a cheap fix.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Deep well pump wont shut off
shannonw wrote:

This does not sound like a water logged tank. The symptoms would be different.

1. If you have steel pipe in your well, it may have a small hole in it not allowing the pump to build pressure. Also may have a hole in a steel coupling. Another problem we are seeing is with pvc couplings being cracked. If you have steel pipe I would suggest replacing with pvc. It gives you so much better water quality and never goes bad.

3. This one is an expensive speculation. I don't think this is it but it is still a possibility. The pump is putting out only what the well is producing. If this is the case, the well would have to be drilled deeper. I only mention this because I don't know what part of the country you are in. 175 feet may be deep in your area. In the area I live in I can go an hour north and the wells range from 100 feet to 200 feet or I can go 30 minutes south and the wells range from 700 feet to 1500 feet. So again I don't know what is normal where you are.

Best wishes and hope the problem is a cheap fix.

Excellent point no.1.

Point number 3 seems unlikely because the OP didn't say anything about large amounts of air in the water.

Jack

JimHog
Re: Deep well pump wont shut off
carlcgland wrote:

it could just be the impeller is worn on the pump, the pump works as you say, so the impeller would be something to check out. If the pump is working, maybe not to it's full power, then the pump as stated before. I'd check the impeller and pump bearings before I'd invest in a new pump.

If you knew what you were talking about, you would know that that submersible pumps do not have an impeller. they have multi stage disc that raise water from one stage to the next.

Fencepost
Re: Deep well pump wont shut off

The pump itself can certainly be rebuilt, but it may be more cost effective to simply replace the pump (and the wire & pipe, if there's any sign of aging). The big expense is hiring a pump service co. with a crane truck to remove the pump from the well and put it back in. The last thing you want is to rebuild the pump then have the motor or the pipe go out in a couple of years, requiring another call to remove the pump from the well.

keith3267
Re: Deep well pump wont shut off

My first though was that the bottom backflow valve had gone bad, I had this happen to me, but the pump still got up to pressure, but as soon as it shut off, the pressure would drop and the pump would come back on. It also caused a lot of air to get into the system.

I favor the hole in the pipe theory because that could limit the pump pressure and since the pump is not shutting off, it wouldn't get any (not much anyway) air into the water. I disregard the worn pump because if the owner manually shuts off the pump, he looses pressure, but the pump may be worn out, but I don't think that is the root cause of this problem.

Since the whole pipe has to be pulled out anyway, if the pump is old, it might be a good time to replace the whole line and pump and not have to worry whats next.

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