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jsantoro
Curved Crown Molding

Does anyone know how i can make these cuts? My ceiling kinda barrels downward and for the life of me i can't get it done.

A. Spruce
Re: Curved Crown Molding

I would have started in that corner and worked my way out, would be easier than working into it.

That being said, the left side shouldn't be too difficult, it's just a short straight piece. Do not install this one until you've dealt with the curved wall.

The right hand piece on the curved wall, how long is the entire curve? If possible, I would use a full length piece to span the curve. Trying to piece something like that together, I'm afraid the joints would open up on you, if you could get them to close tightly to begin with. If you have to have a joint, then I would build the joint down on the ground and install a backer across the joint to keep it stable and strong, then cut the ends to fit the length needed.

Fencepost
Re: Curved Crown Molding

One way of dealing with this is to cut the molding in thin strips (you'll probably need two pieces to account for saw kerf) then bend & glue them around a form to create a curved molding. It's not too hard with window casing, but crown molding is going to be somewhat more difficult due to the fact that it's installed at an angle relative to the wall and ceiling.

Here's the first part of a 7-part video series on the subject. The meaningful part of the video starts around 4:40.
http://www.youtube.com/user/woodmastertools#p/u/10/qsTZRpMdMZw

The video features a particular machine, but the concepts should still be applicable.

woodsey
Re: Curved Crown Molding

There is a molding made from a plyable rubber specifically designed to go around barreled ceilings, windows, curved walls, etc.

Go to your home center or lumber yard where you originally bought your moldings. They should be able to order this for you. It comes in different lengths. Or you can search for it on the internet. The type i use is called "Ultra-Flex Molding".

Gizmo
Re: Curved Crown Molding

[QUOTE=woodsey]There is a molding made from a plyable rubber specifically designed to go around barreled ceilings, windows, curved walls, etc.

Woodsey,there are many different brands of rubber flex molding on the market. With jsantoro having some of the crown installed already it is much harder to match the crown height & profile after the fact.

Im with Spruce you should start in the corner's with full length pcs then work you way out. Try & use non finger jointed crown in the radius areas if at all possible.

A. Spruce
Re: Curved Crown Molding
Gizmo wrote:

Try & use non finger jointed crown in the radius areas if at all possible.

Actually, this is one of the few times I'd recommend using MDF rather than wood. MDF is already very flexy, and can easily make the bend shown in the pictures.

Gizmo
Re: Curved Crown Molding
A. Spruce wrote:

Actually, this is one of the few times I'd recommend using MDF rather than wood. MDF is already very flexy, and can easily make the bend shown in the pictures.

I agree Spruce if he can get the exact profile. Either way when installing crown on a radius the tail end of the crown will always drop down as you bend it arounnd the wall.

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