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terryoneill
Coping moldings

I would like to know if there are any tools, saws or jigs that can be used for coping baseboards or crown molding

A. Spruce
Re: Coping moldings

I do not know of one, though coping isn't all that difficult, you use a miter box or chop saw to cut an "inside" corner, then follow the cut line on the face of the trim with the coping saw. You cope a slight back bevel of a couple degrees so that you get a tighter fit when the coped trim is placed against the face of it's mate.

Outside corners and splices are cut as normal on a chop saw or miter box.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Coping moldings

Here's one. http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?p=WX2&i=101394
This is not a recommendation, I have never used one.
Jack

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: Coping moldings
terryoneill wrote:

I would like to know if there are any tools, saws or jigs that can be used for coping baseboards or crown molding

yes there is!

a coping saw
a pencil
a piece of moulding cut at 90 degrees used as a tracing templet.

goldhiller
Re: Coping moldings
terryoneill wrote:

I would like to know if there are any tools, saws or jigs that can be used for coping baseboards or crown molding

Besides your normal hand-held coping saw followed by files and/or sandpaper, there is also......(besides those already suggested)

The Collins coping foot for a sabre saw...... http://www.collinstool.com/collins_coping_foot.htm

and/or coping with a hand-held grinder.

These are links to vids of grinder coping. They will automatically play with Media Player once fully downloaded. (If you're on dial-up...it will take a while.)

http://forums.taunton.com/n/mb/at.asp?webtag=tp-breaktime&guid=9AA2D8A8-D53A-4FF0-880E-E2F457B0F8EF&frames=no

http://forums.taunton.com/n/mb/at.asp?webtag=tp-breaktime&guid=489ABB79-83D2-492A-808E-0965F7E95993&frames=no

This is one of coping with the Collins foot.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W02ZLlnSXXY

When coping with a grinder........mount two discs back to back. 24 or 36 grit depending upon whether hardwood or softwood...and your skill level at handling the grinder. Very fast, but also very dusty. Do it outside. ;)

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Coping moldings
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

yes there is!

a coping saw
a pencil
a piece of moulding cut at 90 degrees used as a tracing templet.

If you cut the moulding at 45 degrees you don't need to trace the outline.
Jack

A. Spruce
Re: Coping moldings
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

If you cut the moulding at 45 degrees you don't need to trace the outline.
Jack

I'm still trying to figure out how this works ...

Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

a piece of moulding cut at 90 degrees used as a tracing templet.

A piece of molding cut at 90 degrees would be a butt cut, which wouldn't match up too well against anything with a profile, much less if the profile is canted as is the case of crown molding.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Coping moldings
A. Spruce wrote:

I'm still trying to figure out how this works ...

A piece of molding cut at 90 degrees would be a butt cut, which wouldn't match up too well against anything with a profile, much less if the profile is canted as is the case of crown molding.

Maybe she just uses drops.
Jack

Fencepost
Re: Coping moldings

I don't know of any way to make coping NOT be tedious. It's one of those things that separates craftsmen from the installers. I think I might've coped an inside joint once. But I've mitered many. I guess that makes me an installer. :o

When joining two moldings of the same profile in a 90 degree corner, cut the first molding at 90* and butt it into the corner. Cut the second piece at a 45* angle as if you were doing a mitered joint. Now, using a coping saw, cut along the "cut line" -- this is where the 45* miter meets the face of the molding -- with a little bit of a back-angle so you are removing the miter cut and a little bit more on the back side. In the end you should have cut out a reverse profile that matches the profile of the piece you are butting against. This little trick of cutting a miter saves you the hassle of trying to trace a line to cut along.

If you are joining dissimilar profiles, there is no substitute for tracing the profile. In most cases, the larger molding should butt into the corner; the smaller moulding should be coped to the larger. The best way to trace the profile is to use a compass or dividers. Place the molding to be coped against the molding that is in place. Open the dividers to the width of the largest gap between the moldings. Holding the dividers parallel to the molding being coped (one point on the installed molding, the other point or pencil on the coped molding), trace the profile of the installed molding to the face of the coped molding. Cut along this line, carving out a little more behind the molding so your coping will butt tightly against the installed molding.

When placing your coped joints, consider the visual lines in the room. Ideally, you should not be able to look into the joint. This means that the coped molding should not be on the wall opposite the door or where the seating area faces. Considering this will help you to hide the joints. Mitered inside joints are much harder to hide than a properly coped joint!

So how did it get the name coping?

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Coping moldings

From Websters-coping- something resembling a cope (as by concealing or covering)
Jack

Fencepost
Re: Coping moldings

I'll add that when you are using your coping saw, don't put a lot of pressure on it. This will cause the saw to go astray. Just let the weight of the saw do the work; all you have to do is push it back and forth and steer. Take your time, you'll end up with a neater job :) and less frustration :mad:.

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