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Ctsprigner
Contractor framed walls too short
Ctsprigner

I am new and have already written this twice but lost the text both times. My contractor frame walls in my basement but left almost 3/4 inch gap between the wall and the joist. The nails are visible in the space. His reason is he ordered the lumber the wrong size. He tried to stack to 2x4's horizontally over the top of the framed wall to bridge his significant space issue.

I have tried to upload an image but have failed repeatedly, I should be able to figure that out considering I am a web developer...

Is it normal to have a space between your framed wall and the ceiling.

Second question.

Is there any reason you would not tie your laundry drain into the existing drain in the utility room? It is a new construction home. They seem to be digging holes looking for the main drain line. Can't you just pull the blueprints of the house and know exactly where the drain lines are?

Thank in advance!

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Contractor framed walls too short
Sombreuil_mongrel

Here is an illustrated interpretation of the code for washer drains. Your local codes may vary.

A. Spruce
Re: Contractor framed walls too short
A. Spruce
Ctsprigner wrote:

I am new and have already written this twice but lost the text both times. My contractor frame walls in my basement but left almost 3/4 inch gap between the wall and the joist. The nails are visible in the space. His reason is he ordered the lumber the wrong size. He tried to stack to 2x4's horizontally over the top of the framed wall to bridge his significant space issue.

I have tried to upload an image but have failed repeatedly, I should be able to figure that out considering I am a web developer...

Is it normal to have a space between your framed wall and the ceiling.

Second question.

Is there any reason you would not tie your laundry drain into the existing drain in the utility room? It is a new construction home. They seem to be digging holes looking for the main drain line. Can't you just pull the blueprints of the house and know exactly where the drain lines are?

Thank in advance!

1 - If his only reasoning for the gap is that he ordered the wrong material, then your contractor is a complete and total idiot! Apparently, he lacks the ability to return said materials for right materials OR to buy a 1x4 to fill the gap OR to be able to use a saw and cut his own shims.

2 - Due to extensive spam, TOH has disabled image uploading to their server, you must host your images elsewhere and link them here using the image icon, clicking "from URL", pasting image address, unchecking "retrieve remote info", and clicking submit. Now, images are posted in line, so you are able to write text and add images as you go.

3 - Very rarely is it normal to have gaps in your spacing, there are reasons, occasionally, it is definitely not the norm.

4 - Can you tie the laundry into the existing drain, if it is the main waste line of the house, yes, if it is the drain in the floor, probably not, depends on local code and the design of your drain system. As for how to find the drain, it's not too difficult, particularly on a newly constructed house where plans would be on file down at the building department. In lieu of that, dousing can be used, or, hire a plumber who knows what he's doing and not the guy that you have, who, by your accounts, is lacking in skill and knowledge.

Fencepost
Re: Contractor framed walls too short
Fencepost
Ctsprigner wrote:

Is there any reason you would not tie your laundry drain into the existing drain in the utility room? It is a new construction home. They seem to be digging holes looking for the main drain line. Can't you just pull the blueprints of the house and know exactly where the drain lines are?

It is common for the plans to NOT include the exact location of pipes and wires. Generally the plans only specify the location of fixtures; it's up to the plumber (or the electrician) to determine the best way to run the pipes based on the framing, or for under slab lines, out of the way of footings.

In fact, it's common for the plans not to specify the location of every stick of wood in a house; it's up to the framer to put them in the most logical places. The locations are specified where an engineer has designed a portion of the structure to meet specific code or strength requirements.

It's really nice for the plumber when the framer THINKS about where the plumbing fixtures will be and doesn't put a floor joist right in the middle of the toilet drain. Or lays out the bathroom correctly so the one-piece fiberglass tub/shower unit fits between the walls.

Jack
Re: Contractor framed walls too short
Jack

I'm going to guess your utility drain is 1½" most modern washers require a 2" drain.

Jack

Mastercarpentry
Re: Contractor framed walls too short
Mastercarpentry

There is never any gap permissible anywhere in framing. Being in an imperfect world you may end up with some tiny gaps (like 1/64" here and there) but any more than that is simply pure laziness and carelessness. The gaps you speak of are completely unacceptable and a total re-do is called for. It is permissible to add plates at the top of a wall and that is often done for expediency, but in many old houses you are better off cutting the studs to the needed height to conform to the existing discrepancies.

I hope you haven't paid these people. Tell them they have one chance to get back out there and do it right or you'll have to get someone else to do it correctly then get the lawyers involved to get your money back. You paid to have it done right and that is what you should get- you should not have to pay again for anything.

As a contractor I can tell you it really sucks to have to eat extra expenses caused by your own screw-ups or omissions but that's how you learn the business and operate it. It's your work- own it and be proud of doing it right even when you lose money for missing something you shouldn't have missed. Live this way and you'll either learn to do it right quickly or you'll get out of the business for something you're more capable of handling, like saying "May I take your order please?" :p

Phil

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Contractor framed walls too short
Sombreuil_mongrel
Mastercarpentry wrote:

There is never any gap permissible anywhere in framing. Being in an imperfect world you may end up with some tiny gaps (like 1/64" here and there) but any more than that is simply pure laziness and carelessness. The gaps you speak of are completely unacceptable and a total re-do is called for. It is permissible to add plates at the top of a wall and that is often done for expediency, but in many old houses you are better off cutting the studs to the needed height to conform to the existing discrepancies.

I hope you haven't paid these people. Tell them they have one chance to get back out there and do it right or you'll have to get someone else to do it correctly then get the lawyers involved to get your money back. You paid to have it done right and that is what you should get- you should not have to pay again for anything.

As a contractor I can tell you it really sucks to have to eat extra expenses caused by your own screw-ups or omissions but that's how you learn the business and operate it. It's your work- own it and be proud of doing it right even when you lose money for missing something you shouldn't have missed. Live this way and you'll either learn to do it right quickly or you'll get out of the business for something you're more capable of handling, like saying "May I take your order please?" :p

Phil

If the gap at the top plate is exactly 3/4, then the solution is strips of 3/4 plywood added to the top.
Casey

dj1
Re: Contractor framed walls too short
dj1

1. The solution of filling the gap with a strip of plywood is the only compromise. It will work.

2. There are ways to locate the main drain line, with the right equipment. "They" just don't want to pay for this service, so they are digging all over. Not acceptable. And stupid.

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