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Tcp
connection to toilet
Tcp

So just bought my first home a few months back and noticed this on one of the toilets. Is this tight of a connection ok? The line is a poly braid. Also its on a compression valve right over some baseboard....

dj1
Re: connection to toilet
dj1

Looks fine to me.

You have a compression angle stop valve and a flex connector.

Does the compression angle stop: 1. easy to turn off and on? 2. stops all water when in off position, meaning, doesn't let any water, not even a drop thru in off position?...If you answered YES and YES, you're good, for now.

Tcp
Re: connection to toilet
Tcp

Havent tried to move the valve handle a bit late to open up a can of worms. Had one valve under the kitchen sink spray water everywhere when I moved the handle. Ended up replacing with a 1/4 turn sweat valve. Compression valve ferrels can be removed pretty easily with a pair of channel locks... just doesnt seem as good of a joint as a sweat.

A. Spruce
Re: connection to toilet
A. Spruce

Everything looks fine to me, however, that is a VERY cheap angle stop, so don't trust that you'll be able to turn it off when the need arises.

Tcp wrote:

Had one valve under the kitchen sink spray water everywhere when I moved the handle. Ended up replacing with a 1/4 turn sweat valve. Compression valve ferrels can be removed pretty easily with a pair of channel locks... just doesnt seem as good of a joint as a sweat.

I was doing a major remodel last summer and had the same problem. We were replacing tile counters with faux marble and new hardware. I did all the demo, leaving the original steel sinks and plumbing in place, knowing that there'd be trouble with the 30 year old and cheap angle stops. The day the new top arrived, I had also arranged for the plumber to be there to handle replacement of all the old supplies and drain. When I went to turn off the angle stops the first one twisted off in my hand and I had to send the plumber running for the water main while I held the broken parts together and averted a flood. When I moved the the second sink, the angle stops there also twisted off in my hand, thankfully, this time the water was already off!

The new top got set, the plumber replaced all the garbage with new, 1/4 turn, fresh hoses, and drains. It's been a year and nary a callback on any of the work.

I also agree with you on using sweat and threaded fittings over compression fittings.:cool:

dj1
Re: connection to toilet
dj1

You know what I would do? I would replace all angle stops and connectors. Washing machine connectors too.

I never hesitate or think twice about replacing angle stops and connectors in my rentals.

Caution: when you remove the sleeve on a compression valve, use a special tool. If you use an adjustable wrench you could damage the copper pipe, a situation that can create leaks.

dj1
Re: connection to toilet
dj1

While you're at it...how's your main shut off valve? A dependable valve will stop water flow 100%. Not 99%, but 100%.

You can continue: Do you have a water pressure gauge? check your water pressure. Between 50 and 75 is OK.

There's more...it's called "the joy of home ownership".

Tcp
Re: connection to toilet
Tcp

Replaced a few valves under the kitchen sink and bathroom sink. Valves from the big box stores seem very loose before sweating onto pipe.... Wondering if I should buy them from a plumbing supply store instead next time.... At first I thought it was because I put a sweat valve on the end of what was previously a compression valve end. I didnt have the space to cut back and the ferrule came off with little to no effort and pipe end wasnt compressed. Even dry fitted valves in a new piece of pipe to check and it was just as loose. Pipe was of quality type L.

dj1
Re: connection to toilet
dj1
Tcp wrote:

Replaced a few valves under the kitchen sink and bathroom sink. Valves from the big box stores seem very loose before sweating onto pipe.... Wondering if I should buy them from a plumbing supply store instead next time.... At first I thought it was because I put a sweat valve on the end of what was previously a compression valve end. I didnt have the space to cut back and the ferrule came off with little to no effort and pipe end wasnt compressed. Even dry fitted valves in a new piece of pipe to check and it was just as loose. Pipe was of quality type L.

Pipe size may vary slightly from batch to batch, but still considered acceptable. Usually Type L are harder to fit in the fittings. The solder fills in all gaps to create a tight bond.

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