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Nick of Pittsburgh
Re: Clay Drain Pipe
Nick of Pittsburgh
Mastercarpentry wrote:

The OP described this as where the downspout enters the piping system so a perfect seal isn't much needed. If you can find ABS or PVC that fits without 'falling through' to where it may block the drain, just stuff it in there and use mortar or concrete grout to seal/fasten it. Good enough, and should the PVC need replacing you can wiggle it out andn slide a new one right in.

Done this a number of times myself as many older houses in the city were piped this way; the usual issue I have with these is that the piping got crushed so we have to replace the whole thing.

Phil

Thanks! This was my original idea.

I was going to try to use a grinding tool with a cutting disc to slice off the top of the pipe right BELOW the damage. But I was worried if while cutting I crack the pipe what would I do?

So my back up plan was just sliding a PVC section with the square fitting on top of the bell. You suggested concrete grout ( are you talking about mortar mix??) to seal it.

Last night I was thinking of even using ROOFING cement. Would roofing cement be even better. Maybe more flexible?

Thanks so much!

Mastercarpentry
Re: Clay Drain Pipe
Mastercarpentry

Concrete grout is just concrete without gravel; mortar mix has more sand but will work equally well. Grout is harder when cured. Just don't clog the pipe with excess falling in. Tear some newspaper into strips, twist together loosely to stay in place, then mix just enough to cover that. Once dry continue filling. You shouldn't have to remove the PVC but if that concerns you wrap the fitting with clear mailing tape which will degrade in time leaving you with a slip fit. You can caulk around the top if you wish.

Old clay pipes can be very brittle so I wouldn't disturb it any more than I absolutely had to. If aesthetics of the broken fitting is a problem, create a collar to cover it- a large enough pipe coupler fitting can be slipped on before attaching the downspout and that filled with mortar or grout similarly, Sand it lightly first if you want to paint it; this should also strengthen the point somewhat against further damage so all you'll need to do is renew the paint occasionally. A metal collar will work equally well.

And tell the next work crew that you are taking pictures of it before they start and they'll have to fix it at their expense if they damage it- and that the pipe is so brittle that will probably mean replacing the whole pipe. They won't break it again- promise!

Phil

Nick of Pittsburgh
Re: Clay Drain Pipe
Nick of Pittsburgh
Mastercarpentry wrote:

Concrete grout is just concrete without gravel; mortar mix has more sand but will work equally well. Grout is harder when cured. Just don't clog the pipe with excess falling in. Tear some newspaper into strips, twist together loosely to stay in place, then mix just enough to cover that. Once dry continue filling. You shouldn't have to remove the PVC but if that concerns you wrap the fitting with clear mailing tape which will degrade in time leaving you with a slip fit. You can caulk around the top if you wish.

Old clay pipes can be very brittle so I wouldn't disturb it any more than I absolutely had to. If aesthetics of the broken fitting is a problem, create a collar to cover it- a large enough pipe coupler fitting can be slipped on before attaching the downspout and that filled with mortar or grout similarly, Sand it lightly first if you want to paint it; this should also strengthen the point somewhat against further damage so all you'll need to do is renew the paint occasionally. A metal collar will work equally well.

And tell the next work crew that you are taking pictures of it before they start and they'll have to fix it at their expense if they damage it- and that the pipe is so brittle that will probably mean replacing the whole pipe. They won't break it again- promise!

Phil

So you think using ROOFING cement instead of Mortar Mix or Concrete Grout would NOT BE OK?

If I used the mortar mix, I was going to use newspaper to stuff up any gaps. The inside diameter of the clay pipe is slighter SMALLER than the outside diameter of the PVC. The damaged clay pipe I am going to just dig around & then remove altogether.

So the PVC pipe will be sitting in the bell of the NEXT section of clay pipe, hopefully good clay pipe - still buried, I just thought holding it and then filling in that with black roofing cement will serve to both secure and seal the PVC to the bell. Then I would backfill it after the black roofing cement dries.

Actually the damaged pipe just had the metal down spout sealed with black roofing cement into the clay section and that was there for YEARS AND YEARS.

I'd actually rather use black roofing cement. Do you think that would be ok?

ed21
Re: Clay Drain Pipe
ed21

Have you actually measured the fitting? A 4" clay pipe measures 4" inside diameter, so a 4" pipe should be about 5" outside. The picture of the fitting posted seems to indicate that.
I don't see a problem just inserting a pvc pipe into the clay pipe especially if it is just under the surfaces and just grass around it. If you can't find a connector that fits, a decent fit with a piece of pvc and some silicone caulk would hold it in place.

Nick of Pittsburgh
Re: Clay Drain Pipe
Nick of Pittsburgh
ed21 wrote:

Have you actually measured the fitting? A 4" clay pipe measures 4" inside diameter, so a 4" pipe should be about 5" outside. The picture of the fitting posted seems to indicate that.
I don't see a problem just inserting a pvc pipe into the clay pipe especially if it is just under the surfaces and just grass around it. If you can't find a connector that fits, a decent fit with a piece of pvc and some silicone caulk would hold it in place.

Yeah I measured the pipe and I also measured ANOTHER clay pipe that acts as a vent for my sewer line. They are all 5" for OUTSIDE diameter. And the inside diameter is SLIGHTLY less than 4". So I can't slide the PVC into the inside of the clay pipe. Of course, the PVC will fit into the bell of the drownspout line no problem.

Thanks for the help!

I have to say I like the LOOK of older homes. But I really appreciate "MODERN Construction" much more.

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