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susan72
chalk paint?

4 years ago my husband repainted our bathroom ceiling. He found that primer was not adhering and the paint was flaking off like chalk when he touched it (the old paint, not the primer). Someone from the local paint store said it was probably what he referred to as "chalk paint" and that it would all need to be scraped and washed before we could repaint. He wore a mask and glasses and the whole bathroom was covered with this chaulky substance by the time he was done, but he cleaned it all up, primed and painted. Within a year the paint started to peel. We do have an exhaust fan that was installed that same year and we use it. I'm wondering if it's still this old crappy "chaulk paint" coming back to haunt us. Any recommendations for making sure it works when we repaint this time?

NEC
Re: chalk paint?

Yes, take the time to wash hair, shower and get out. Three minutes max is all it takes.

susan72
Re: chalk paint?

So if I'm someone who is admittedly not knowledgeable about many of the issues with owning and maintaining a house but attempting to educate myself, this is a bad place to come because all I'm going to get are flippant responses? Just checking. I don't want to waste my time if that's the case.

NEC
Re: chalk paint?

Naw, you just do not want to hear the truth. Not flippant at all.

Your showers are so long as to turn the place into a steam bath. Paint, unless epoxy, will fall off the wall.

susan72
Re: chalk paint?

Does anyone else actually have any helpful suggestions for me?

With regard to the erroneous assumptions, we are not a family that takes long steamy showers, we use an exhaust fan, and had never had this problem in any other bathroom prior to this house.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: chalk paint?

Peeling paint is generally an indication of moisture getting in behind the paint. Have you check your exhaust fan to make sure it's sealed, the duct is sealed and going to the outside. It could be the duct has come loose or who ever installed it did not duct it to the outside.
Jack

ordjen
Re: chalk paint?

Susan,
You failed to state how old your house is and if it has plaster walls. If it is old and plastered, you might be experiencing a calcimine residue. Calcimine was used in the early part of the last century, mostly on ceilings. It was extremely chalky and was water soluble. If you painted over it with a latex paint, it would immediately fester up . Oil paint would generally hold if painted on calcimine, however, if someone later painted with latex paint over the oil paint, the moisture would slowly work its way to the calsimine and the whole thing would let loose.
If this is what you are experiencing, you have to get all the way down to the bare plaster, clean it and then prime the bare plaster before applying a finish coat.

I would second JLMCDANIEL's thoughts on checking that your vent is properly discharging its moist air to the outside, and not just dumping it above the ceiling in the attic.

Viensmd
Re: chalk paint?
susan72 wrote:

4 years ago my husband repainted our bathroom ceiling. He found that primer was not adhering and the paint was flaking off like chalk when he touched it (the old paint, not the primer). Someone from the local paint store said it was probably what he referred to as "chalk paint" and that it would all need to be sc****d and washed before we could repaint. He wore a mask and glasses and the whole bathroom was covered with this chaulky substance by the time he was done, but he cleaned it all up, primed and painted. Within a year the paint started to peel. We do have an exhaust fan that was installed that same year and we use it. I'm wondering if it's still this old crappy "chaulk paint" coming back to haunt us. Any recommendations for making sure it works when we repaint this time?

I have a real answer unfortunately years late! Just repaint the ceiling with a current chalk paint, found at Home Depot. Since it is the same material, there is no real " second layer," to peel off. Then seal with a special clear sealer for chalk paint. You'll have to remove the current peeling paint and get down to the surface the chalk paint was originally on. Don't try scraping that again. All the chalk will never really come out because it has blended/leeched into the ceiling material.
worked great in my 1890's Victorian, no peeling, it's been 8 years! Hope this helps Somebody♈️

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