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GregInGA
Chair molding intersection
GregInGA

I have a long piece of chair rail molding that has already been bevel cut. I assume it's at 45 degrees but it was already in place on an existing wall and I removed it to replace a piece of drywall behind it. Now I want to re-install it

I want to intersect it with a shorter piece (yet to be cut)

How can I cut the shorter piece to intersect snugly with the longer piece. I don't want to cut the longer piece with a coping saw if I can help it. Is there another way.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Chair molding intersection
Sombreuil_mongrel

Hi,
If you're dead-set against coping, cut the 45* angle first, then with the aid of a sacrificial fence (to prevent kickback) make the 90* cut. If it's too long, shorten the 90* end with a belt sander held upside-down. I would use glue or caulk to hold it in, unless you have an 18ga. brad gun; hand finish nailing will probably split it.
The coping method is preferred; you cope the longer piece; the shorty had 2 @ 90* ends. The cope traps the small piece in place very well.
Casey

Fencepost
Re: Chair molding intersection
Fencepost

^^^What Casey said. NEVER try to hold a tiny piece of wood when using power tools; there is extremely high danger of injury or loss of a finger.

Instead, as Casey suggested, cut the 45 degree angle at the end of a larger piece of trim. Then make your 90 degree cut against a longer sacrificial board that's fastened to both halves of the saw fence -- that way, there's no gap in the fence for the small piece to slip through. For safety, the piece that you make your cut from should be at least 18" long so you can firmly hold it against the fence with your fingers safely out of the way of the blade.

Before making your cuts, use a piece of cardboard to mock up the angle. Hold the long piece in place, and trim a 45-ish angle on the cardboard and trim it until it is snug against the existing angle and the wall. Use this as a guide to set the angle on your miter saw.

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