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tgprestwood
ceiling fan

Have a client that wants ceiling fan in bathroom.Bathroom is large with large walk in shower.Good idea or bad?

JLMCDANIEL
Re: ceiling fan

Nothing wrong with it and if that what the client wants....
However it does not take the place of proper venting.
Jack

tgprestwood
Re: ceiling fan

JLmCDANIEL,
tHE CLIENT DOES HAVE VENT SYSTEM INSTALLED.i APPRECIATE THE INPUT,i WAS CONCERNED BECAUSE OF THE MOISTURE FACTOR.

canuk
Re: ceiling fan

I don't recall ever seeing a ceiling fan in a bathroom and curious if it wouldn't interfere with the exhaust fan when both are running.

It rings a bell that there are UL ratings for fans to be used in " damp" and "wet" locations.
"Damp" and "wet" rated ceiling fans would be specially constructed to resist rust and moisture buildup.

So for bathrooms a UL rating of "damp" and for outdoor spaces a UL rating of "wet" would be necessary..... perhaps the outdoor rated would even be better for the bathroom.

Just 2 cents.:)

JLMCDANIEL
Re: ceiling fan

If you are really concerned you could go with something like these http://www.airdistributor.com/harsh_environment_ceiling_fans.htm

However I would like to point out the regular ceiling fans are routinely installed in kitchen areas with no problems. A kitchen probably exposes the fans to as much moisture as a bathroom.
Jack

canuk
Re: ceiling fan
YukYuk wrote:

All outdoor installations and all bathroom area installations are not necessarily wet locations, but are considered damp locations at a minimum (ex. covered porch ceiling or similar projection may be considered a damp location outdoors, not wet location).

You'd need to consult the list of prevailing codes in your area, Building Codes (ex. IRC, Plumbing Codes, electrical codes, and others).

Generally (and refering to the 2005 NEC) Article 410.4(D) would apply, if adopted by your authority having jurisdiction (defines the "no-no" zone which cannot be entered by any portion of the fixture, including the padle fan blades for shower areas and tub areas which is generally 3' out from the shower threshold, rim, etc. and 8' above the water-line) this area is restricted to wet location fixtures ceiling flush mounted. Conditions of the actual location would need to be considered (ex. steam shower, fixed rotational shower head on shower arm versus a shower wand that could permit direct spray to the area occupied by the fan fixture even accidentially, excessive condensation, etc.) which can require indoor locations to be considered wet locations (see 300.6(D) for some examples of indoor wet location additional clarifications, i.e. washed wall, etc.) a minimum listed damp location indoor use fixture for this area, may require a listed wet location, yet listed for indoor use fixture. Additional considerations regarding sealing conduit, type of wiring, outlet or fixture box, other sealing for moisture covered in other areas of Chapters 1-4. Check for local ammendments to the NEC if adopted, verify which edition adopted, and look for additional restrictions in the other applicable code adoptions and their ammendments.

Unless there are extremely tall ceilings and/or the exaust ventilation fan is wall mounted, and the shower room is quite large; I wouldn't recommend having a paddle fan in a bathroom that also has an exaust fan for practical considerations of containing moisture in the area to be collected and exausted outdoors, condensation collection on the blades and dripping or spinning off into the room, and breezes causing a chilling effect on the wet naked body. Keep in mind additional clearance from the floor to the blades than in regular living spaces should be kept in mind as in the bathroom activities such as flipping a towel over ones back with an arm outstretched to the ceiling to dry off, is more likely to take place, than in other areas of the home. Also keep in mind the difficulty in clearing the paddle fan blades while elevated to clean areas of the bathroom (top of shower enclosure, mirrors, light fixtures, etc.) and the difficulty in accessing the fan blades themselves to keep them clean.

It was simply a point of mentioning there are UL listed fans for "damp" and "wet" areas along with the intended areas for use.

Re: ceiling fan
YukYuk wrote:

All outdoor installations and all bathroom area installations are not necessarily wet locations, but are considered damp locations at a minimum (ex. covered porch ceiling or similar projection may be considered a damp location outdoors, not wet location).

You'd need to consult the list of prevailing codes in your area, Building Codes (ex. IRC, Plumbing Codes, electrical codes, and others).

I am assuming you are asking about installing a ceiling paddle type fan (with or without a light) in addition to the existing fan assisted exaust ventillation.

Generally (and refering to the 2005 NEC) Article 410.4(D) would apply, if adopted by your authority having jurisdiction (defines the "no-no" zone which cannot be entered by any portion of the fixture, including the paddle fan blades for shower areas and tub areas which is generally 3' out from the shower threshold, rim, etc. and 8' above the water-line) this area is restricted to wet location fixtures ceiling flush mounted. Conditions of the actual location would need to be considered (ex. steam shower, fixed rotational shower head on shower arm versus a shower wand that could permit direct spray to the area occupied by the fan fixture even accidentially, excessive condensation, etc.) which can require indoor locations to be considered wet locations (see 300.6(D) for some examples of indoor wet location additional clarifications, i.e. washed wall, etc.) a minimum listed damp location indoor use fixture for this area, may require a listed wet location, yet listed for indoor use fixture. Additional considerations regarding sealing conduit, type of wiring, outlet or fixture box, other sealing for moisture covered in other areas of Chapters 1-4. Check for local ammendments to the NEC if adopted, verify which edition adopted, and look for additional restrictions in the other applicable code adoptions and their ammendments. Also keep in mind maintenance accessibility to the fixture and the outlet box behind it 110.26(F)(1) and 110.11; 410.4(A) and 404.14(E) regarding dimmers and similar controls (speed controls) requiring proper rating for (the environment and) application they are placed in.

Unless there are extremely tall ceilings and/or the exaust ventilation fan is wall mounted, and the shower room is quite large; I wouldn't recommend having a paddle fan in a bathroom that also has an exaust fan for practical considerations of containing moisture in the area to be collected and exausted outdoors, condensation collection on the blades and dripping or spinning off into the room, and breezes causing a chilling effect on the wet naked body. Keep in mind additional clearance from the floor to the blades than in regular living spaces should be kept in mind as in the bathroom activities such as flipping a towel over ones back with an arm outstretched to the ceiling to dry off, is more likely to take place, than in other areas of the home. Also keep in mind the difficulty in clearing the paddle fan blades while elevated to clean areas of the bathroom (top of shower enclosure, mirrors, light fixtures, etc.) and the difficulty in accessing the fan blades themselves to keep them clean.

Well the areas I have high lighted are not applicable as this is a residential application.There are no wet walls in a residential building. There are concerns as the distance from the shower and how high it is above the water line of the tub. Generally it is not a good idea to put a fan in the bathroom as it is a damp location and can damage the fan.:)

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