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l.bro
Caulk around bathtub

Hi and thanks for help,

The small section of caulking around bathtub has a hole and I want to repair this. Is there a correct way to do the repair without recaulking the whole bathtub? I have to make sure the repair will prevent water Infiltration. Thanks

A. Spruce
Re: Caulk around bathtub

You need to remove what is no longer adhered, take it back an inch or more into good caulk. Clean the surfaces really well and apply new caulk.

Latex for latex, silicone for silicone, they are not interchangeable.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Caulk around bathtub

The next layer of silicone will not stick to previous layers, so it all has to come out, wash down with alcohol and a scrubby. repeat several times.
Casey

dj1
Re: Caulk around bathtub

If you don't mind variations in the colors, then you can do what was mentioned above.

I hope you don't have 100% silicone around your tub, which is hard to remove, hard to work with.

l.bro
Re: Caulk around bathtub

If caulking is 100% silicone, how do I remove it easily? Also which caulk should I use when recaulking the bathtub ? Could latex caulking make a good seal around the bath? My tub doesn't have the lip around the tub..

dj1
Re: Caulk around bathtub
l.bro wrote:

If caulking is 100% silicone, how do I remove it easily? Also which caulk should I use when recaulking the bathtub ? Could latex caulking make a good seal around the bath? My tub doesn't have the lip around the tub..

Are you sure it's 100% silicone?

It will be hard to remove, even a small portion of it. Use a utility knife or a sharp wood chisel, but don't damage the tub.

Use a matching caulking to what you have.

A. Spruce
Re: Caulk around bathtub
l.bro wrote:

If caulking is 100% silicone, how do I remove it easily? Also which caulk should I use when recaulking the bathtub ? Could latex caulking make a good seal around the bath? My tub doesn't have the lip around the tub..

Removing any caulk is a very labor intensive job, particularly in the case of silicone, since nothing, including silicone will stick to it. It is pretty easy to tell what you've got by how it looks and feels. Latex caulk will be hard yet slightly pliable if it's not too old. Silicone will be soft and rubbery.

Use a combination of a utility knife, single bladed razor paint scr-aper, even paint sticks. If you can find a nonmarking rubber dog chew that will work fantastically for silicone.

With tools in hand, you cut, scr-ape, and dig out the old. If latex, then simply scrubbing down really well with a wet rag will clean the surface well enough for recaulking. If there is mildew present, use bleach to kill the mold and get rid of the staining. If silicone, once you get the bulk removed, you've still got to continue cleaning the surface with alcohol and a scrubby to remove as much of the silicone residue as possible. When you think you've got it clean enough, clean it 3 more times with a fresh scrubby. Again, treat any mildew stain with bleach before reapplying caulk. Regardless of the original caulk type, you can now lay in whatever you like, for the novice I recommend latex for ease of installation and maintenance. Silicone is a major pain in the @$$ to install without making a huge mess.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Caulk around bathtub

Some folks have no problem installing silicone. :rolleyes: Read this tutorial. Its fun and info packed.

We prefer 100% silicone as it never molds. Latex is mold food.

Choose wisely grasshoppah.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Caulk around bathtub

Are we back to the old latex-versus-silicone argument again? Hoo-boy, we're about to have some fun, load them shotguns Momma and brang me ma whiskey jug too! :p

With tile and porcelain I find a brass or soft stainless steel wire brush works well with removing the last traces of silicone but it can scratch softer surfaces. On some tiles brass will leave black marks and carbon steel almost always leaves gray marks. Rubbing hard with old stiff terrycloth also does pretty good; back it with a block of wood to make it go easier. There's no easy way I know of but a well-done silicone job will outlast anything else so the work is worth it.

Latex or silicone, it is imperative that you have no active mold or mildew under it or it will discolor again regardless of what you use. Unless a caulking job is mostly perfect I prefer to re-do the whole thing since the rest will probably follow the old bad part soon but sometimes a partial re-caulk will do OK. Only you can decide which approach you want to take.

Phil

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