Home>Discussions>HEALTH & SAFETY>Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?
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McMike
Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?

Hello,

I have a fairly tight house, with a gas oven, and no outside connection for the range vent. The range is fairly new and I believe running pretty well.

Whenever we use the stove/oven, it elevates the CO in the house. In the 12 to 16 ppm range if just the stove top, or up to 25 or 30 ppm if the oven is used. (based on readings from our Kidde digital CO detectors).

We've gotten pretty good at opening windows, but that's a pain and not fun in the winter.

I want to run a vent duct from the range hood to the outside. Questions:

(1) Are daily doses of CO in the teens and periodic doses in the 20s levels to worry about?

(2) Is an outdoor venting range hood likely to solve the problem?

(3) Is this fan powered vent likely to create negative pressure problems for our gas furnace & gas water heater exhaust? That system current works properly based on the make-up air it gets passively from the crawl space.

Thanks.

dj1
Re: Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?

Quote: "I have a fairly tight house, with a gas oven, and no outside connection for the range vent."

A vent to the outside in necessary.

CO from gas burning appliances, such as ovens, fireplaces, heaters, etc. can kill. Don't become a statistic.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?

click here then scroll down

hollasboy
Re: Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?

A good CO monitor should alarm at unsafe levels. While you mentioned yours has recorded elevated levels, has it ever alarmed?

If it really keeps you up at night, why not switch to electric? Would probably wash out around the same cost as a installing a ventilation system.

Either way, nothing beats a good vent hood over a stove, and not just for CO, but for grease. Especially when frying bacon or cooking other greasy things. If you vent that stuff outside, you won't have years of grease buildup in your kitchen. Try wiping down the tops of your cabinets one day and you will see what I mean. Grease droplets float in the air and slowly coat anything not frequently wiped clean. I have a range without a vent hood before the remodel, and in just a few years everything stored on top of my cabinets had a sticky grease and dust residue on it.

ed21
Re: Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?

I'd say besides a kitchen exhaust, you need someway to introduce fresh air especially when the exhaust is running to prevent backdrafting from other appliances.
Some sort of makeup air is needed to balance the exhaust.
An air to air heat exchanger may be a good idea to keep a tight home supplied with fresh air.

McMike
Re: Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?
ed21 wrote:

I'd say besides a kitchen exhaust, you need someway to introduce fresh air especially when the exhaust is running to prevent backdrafting from other appliances.
Some sort of makeup air is needed to balance the exhaust.
An air to air heat exchanger may be a good idea to keep a tight home supplied with fresh air.

Thanks. From what i was able to glean, a modest fan (<200 cfm) should not be likely to create back draft problems. if so, Broan makes a special makeup air valve/duct system for this exact purpose.

McMike
Re: Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?
hollasboy wrote:

A good CO monitor should alarm at unsafe levels. While you mentioned yours has recorded elevated levels, has it ever alarmed?

If it really keeps you up at night, why not switch to electric? Would probably wash out around the same cost as a installing a ventilation system.

Either way, nothing beats a good vent hood over a stove, and not just for CO, but for grease. Especially when frying bacon or cooking other greasy things. If you vent that stuff outside, you won't have years of grease buildup in your kitchen. Try wiping down the tops of your cabinets one day and you will see what I mean. Grease droplets float in the air and slowly coat anything not frequently wiped clean. I have a range without a vent hood before the remodel, and in just a few years everything stored on top of my cabinets had a sticky grease and dust residue on it.

No, the alarm won't sound at those concentration levels, but the reading show up in memory as peaks. The alarm is designed to sound at more urgently threatening levels.

Yes, grease on every exposed surface. Icky bad.

Cooking with gas is the only way to cook! :cool:

McMike
Re: Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?
HoustonRemodeler wrote:

click here then scroll down

Thanks. Found this useful too: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/makeup-air-range-hoods

McMike
Re: Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?
dj1 wrote:

Quote: "I have a fairly tight house, with a gas oven, and no outside connection for the range vent."

A vent to the outside in necessary.

CO from gas burning appliances, such as ovens, fireplaces, heaters, etc. can kill. Don't become a statistic.

Thanks. Intermittent sub-30 ppm levels are not an immediate health threat. But chronic or sustained exposure is a concern. I have several CO alarms in the home to let me know if urgent levels have been reached.

dj1
Re: Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?

Quote: "Cooking with gas is the only way to cook! "

You got that right !

bill
Re: Carbon monoxide from oven - what to do?

It is funny that you are getting CO from a gas stove. Normally a gas stoves gives off carbon dioxide not carbon monoxide. The flame should be a nice blue flame if the flame is yellow orange then something is wrong.

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