Home>Discussions>PLUMBING>Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?
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ed21
Re: Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?
Gfarra wrote:

ed21,

Regarding your comment on the toilet.....if that was the source, would the sound be louder at the toilet that is causing it...or is it sending the sound through my pipes thus making it appear as if the sound is in the air around me??

Thank you,

George

Probably, but a low vibration could set the pipes humming. Just try turning off the toilets. Easy enough to do if the valves aren't frozen open from old age.
Being gaslighted? Tinnitus? North Koreans? Just kidding. It would annoy the crap out of me too.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?

I have a customer who was kept awake at nights by the battery charger I left plugged in.

A compressor firing off at 3 am is another story

What about turning off the terlit fill valves? If one of the old seats is slightly worn and verrrry slowly running, it could make such a sound.

dj1
Re: Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?

What is strange is that he hears it everywhere and all the time and she doesn't. Psychology 101.

ed21
Re: Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?

If it's nothing in your house or head, I might suspect a low frequency vibration from outside the house is causing the house to reverberate and you seem to be the one that notices. You don't say anything about where you are, but could it be equipment from nearby buildings or equipment? Oil or gas wells. Fracking. Fault lines. Industrial sites. Power equipment. Military sites. I could probably go on, but you get my drift. I understand low frequency sound can travel long distances underground.

Gfarra
Re: Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?

Hi All,

I am in northern NJ in a residential neighborhood. The nearest industry is 20 minutes away, but there are your typical strip mall shopping centers close by. I don't think its traffic noise, which I do hear if I open the window but that has more of s swooshing sound

I do have a utility transformer across the street from me so I guess its possible that is causing a muffled rumbling sound in my house, but when I am outside I don't hear anything remotely close to what I hear inside.

I will try shutting off my toilets. If that doesn't work I am going to buy a mechanics stethoscope and go on a hunt. If that doesn't work, I don't know what to do after that other than ask as many of my friends to have a listen and see if anyone other than me hears this rumbling sound.

Yesterday I was home all day and it was faint during the day and more prominent in the evening.

Thanks all,

George

dj1
Re: Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?

I've heard a lot of bad news about NEW JERSEY power poles, power wires, transfomers and sub stations through the years - enough to point a finger and to say: "It could be that!".

Can you hear it when you are standing near the power pole across the street?

Gfarra
Re: Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?

DJ1

I was planning on standing by the transformer across the street. Some additional information, I can hear it even if I put 33db rated foam ear plugs in my ears. With those in my ears I can barely hear the TV let alone anything else.....except for that low rumbling sound which does not seem to be lower in volume with them in my ears.

Sigh.....this is gonna drive me nuts :( I have a doctors appt with an ENT on Friday. If that comes back clean I'm doing to pick up a mechanics stethoscope and start snooping. I will also start inviting anyone to come over, grab a beer, and sit and listen for my mysterious rumbling in my head :(

Thanks all

George

dj1
Re: Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?
Gfarra wrote:

DJ1

I was planning on standing by the transformer across the street. Some additional information, I can hear it even if I put 33db rated foam ear plugs in my ears. With those in my ears I can barely hear the TV let alone anything else.....except for that low rumbling sound which does not seem to be lower in volume with them in my ears.

Sigh.....this is gonna drive me nuts :( I have a doctors appt with an ENT on Friday. If that comes back clean I'm doing to pick up a mechanics stethoscope and start snooping. I will also start inviting anyone to come over, grab a beer, and sit and listen for my mysterious rumbling in my head :(

Thanks all

George

If you plug your ears shut and still hear the faint sound while nobody else does...here is the bad news: it could be inside your head. Once you have the test done, let us know, before some of us begin to hear things too.

Fencepost
Re: Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?

My grandmother's house had a similar issue.

I have no idea what the actual source was, but there was a power pole outside of her house that would hum constantly. It was more noticeable when the air was extremely calm, and you could hear it inside the house. You could put your hand on the pole and feel it vibrate.

What is especially strange is that there was no transformer on this pole.

I never paid attention to see if it hummed during power outages.

Hillwood
Re: Can plumbing cause a low pitch rumble throughout my home?

My first and only post to this discussion board was for a very similar complaint. When I heard our rumble, though, I could hold on to the cold water line in the basement and feel it vibrate. One day, all of the faucets/toilets in my house expelled tremendous amounts of air, and the rumble was gone. It reappeared a few months later, so I followed instructions for expelling air from pipes that I found ******, and again the rumble disappeared. It hasn't been back. This is what I did - I hope it helps. I know how maddening that sound is!

Instructions
1. Turn on every faucet in the home. This includes the washing machine, outside spigot, and bathroom faucets.
2. Flush all toilets a few times, allowing the water to rush through those pipes as well.
3. Listen for water bubbles to pass through the faucets. This may sound like hissing or popping.
4. Run the water a few minutes more, allowing plenty of water to flush through the pipes once all sounds of air passing through has ceased.
5. Shut the water off at each faucet. Start at the lowest faucet, such as the washing machine or outside spigot. Continue shutting off each faucet one by one, working your way upward until all faucets have been turned off. Your noisy water pipes should now be much quieter, and you should only hear the sound of rushing water when the water is used.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_6725684_remove-air-noise-water-pipes.html

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