Home>Discussions>PAINTING & FINISHING>Can I mix brands of polycrylic on same project?
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bobsmarie
Can I mix brands of polycrylic on same project?

My kitchen cabinets have been painted and finished with one brand of polycrylic. The painter can't get that brand and wants to use another brand over the first brand after thorough drying. I'm not so sure this is right!

If I want to wait a long while, eg a month and use a differnt brand, would that work?

I'm not too happy about this after all the priming, glazing, detailing, etc to come up against this problem.

A. Spruce
Re: Can I mix brands of polycrylic on same project?

You NEVER use different brands of anything without doing a test to see if they are compatible. While one would think that if the label says polycrylic that it would all be the same, they are not! Proprietary blends make every brand different, and these minor differences do not always play well together, so, before you just start slathering on some other brand, make sure it gets tested to see if it's going to play nice or destroy the finish you've already got.

Always test in an inconspicuous area, just in case there is some incompatibility issues.

dj1
Re: Can I mix brands of polycrylic on same project?

Quote: "The painter can't get that brand and wants to use another brand over the first brand after thorough drying. I'm not so sure this is right! "

Correct me if I'm wrong: Your painter ran out of paint in the middle of the job (how did this happen??), he wants to wait for the painted part to dry and then paint again with new paint, this time, the whole thing at once ?

In this case, re-painting the part already painted, plus the part that wasn't painted with the same new paint - might work.

Whose mistake was it to run out of paint in the middle of the job? the painter's? if yes, you should not pay any additional money.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Can I mix brands of polycrylic on same project?

Painting rule #1: You can't paint without paint So the first thing you do is estimate how much paint it will take, allow some extra so that you don't run out so that all the paint will be from one batch (that's Painting Rule #2), then you get the paint.

Unless they are using a local brand which is no longer made they should be able to get matching paint even if it has to be sent from another store. Sometimes a paint will be renamed or relabeled- that happened to one of my favorites a few years ago. Then they did it again a couple years later, but this time they also changed the formula and it's not as good as before.

Knowing how this business goes, I'd guess that this guy either had or got some left-over paint thinking he would do this job on the cheap, then discovered he couldn't get any more when he ran out. You should pay for the paint it takes to do the job once, not one and a half times or more. And it should all be the same kind (from the same batch purchased at the same time from the same store if possible), then every can should be 'boxed' (mixed) together to ensure that every can is identical in content from first to last. That is the only right way to do this and anyone who does not know and do these basic steps isn't the kind of painter I would want around

Phil

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