Home>Discussions>PLUMBING>Burying a drain pipe in a concrete slab with radiant heat
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dnstewart01
Burying a drain pipe in a concrete slab with radiant heat

I have a laundry room built on a concrete slab with radiant heat. The room has a utility sink. The previous owner ran a pvc pipe for the drain across the floor to the center of the room (about 4 feet) to an existing floor drain. This is a tripping hazard and is unsightly. Can I cut into the concrete and bury the drain pipe? How do I deal with the radiant heat? Do I just try my luck and hope I don't cut any heating tubes? Can I repair them if I do? Thanks in advance for the help.

MSSP
Re: Burying a drain pipe in a concrete slab with radiant heat

Usually you can tell right where the radiant heat lines are by feeling the floor.

calcats
u

I don't know how you can feel radient heat tubes through the concrete floor, if you can enlighten me I am always interested in learning something new. Otherwise, I'm not sure how you can cut the floor with a saw and not cut some tubes. If you know who put the tubing in the floor, he may have a schematic that would help. The other question is how often the sink gets used. If it is rarely used I would have the pipe be in place temporarily and take it out and store it when the sink isn't being used. Again, if it is rarely used, maybe a 5 gal. bucket would suffice and the water might evaporate before it is used again. Back to reality, if you are going to use it rather frequently, I would contact a plumber (the original guy if possible)and figure out what repairs will be needed if you cut a chase in the floor for the pipe. Quite frankly, I think this is the best way to approach the situation.Cut the chase, make the repairs, cement it over and your done. Calcats ;)

MSSP
Re: u
calcats wrote:

I don't know how you can feel radient heat tubes through the concrete floor, if you can enlighten me I am always interested in learning something new. Otherwise, I'm not sure how you can cut the floor with a saw and not cut some tubes. If you know who put the tubing in the floor, he may have a schematic that would help. The other question is how often the sink gets used. If it is rarely used I would have the pipe be in place temporarily and take it out and store it when the sink isn't being used. Again, if it is rarely used, maybe a 5 gal. bucket would suffice and the water might evaporate before it is used again. Back to reality, if you are going to use it rather frequently, I would contact a plumber (the original guy if possible)and figure out what repairs will be needed if you cut a chase in the floor for the pipe. Quite frankly, I think this is the best way to approach the situation.Cut the chase, make the repairs, cement it over and your done. Calcats ;)

What I meant is that you can turn radiant floor on high and in about an hour or so you can feel the warmest spot and tell where the lines are at. I shouldnt have said exactly but very close.

allplumb1
Re: Burying a drain pipe in a concrete slab with radiant heat

Youve said that the drain was running into a floor drain. Does this drain have a vent in the wall? If this is the case then you could possibly reroute the drain by tieing into the vent of the floor drain eliminating any floor cutting. I am sure that if you had to cut the floor and did damage lines you could repair them but i would recommend using a liscensed plumber. But look into all other options like i suggested. its much cheaper to repair the wall then the floor.

Redline04
Re: Burying a drain pipe in a concrete slab with radiant heat

I'd highly recommend against trying to cut into the floor.

I have radiant floor heat in my basement, and watched them install all the lines for the system. I have some pictures somewhere too, but not handy at this moment.
When installed, my system consists of 8 "closed" loops. That's 8 separate lines that run in a complete loop from where the system originates all the way around the basement in a basically circular pattern, and back again to the junction block where the heat pump and system circulator are located.
There is no place within my system where you could cut a line like you are trying to do.
The PEX tubes used for the system were installed prior to the floor being poured, so they do sit basically at the bottom of the flooring. Depending on how your system was set, you might be able to do a very shallow trench in the surface of your floor and lay the pipe in that, but I'd try very hard to find an alternative to cutting the floor.

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