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djohns
Re: Build your own cabinets

Have you ever seen a Woodpecker hammering on a metal light pole ? I have . There's no buffet there . They ARE dumb animals after all . :D

Debra
Re: Build your own cabinets
djohns wrote:

Have you ever seen a Woodpecker hammering on a metal light pole ? I have . There's no buffet there . They ARE dumb animals after all . :D

no I haven't, I did see one take advantage of a hole in my metal siding to scavenge in there for food. I was so glad to move away from that house.

waltdeckhouse
Re: Build your own cabinets

I am hoping there are no bugs under the cedarsiding. When I did this before (replace the siding that is) I did not find any bugs. I figured either this bird is dumb or it is looking for a mate. Either way I do not want to tear an entire wall apart just because a bird decided to peck on the siding instead of a tree.

GH and Spruce...thanks for the finishing tips. So far everything seems to have turned out OK. I am finishing some cherry pieces. BTW..does the 40/60 blend work for African Mahogony?

I am tearing up some brick work that I need to ask you fine giving folks about. I will take some pictures to better illustrate the scenario. These are openings in the facade around the fireplace. It looks like they are there for vents and power to the old kitchen...but now that I pulled out all the old cabinets I want it all closed out. I have never done anything with bricks...so this should be interesting :D Once again, this house has provided an unending stream of learning opportunites.

-W

waltdeckhouse
Re: Build your own cabinets

OH yeah...forgot to mention. In our prefvious house we has a metal fireplace flue. We used to have a woodpecker show up everymorning about 6 AM pecking on the metal parts. I don't think he wan motivated by bugs for that situation either.

And, yes, the sound was something to behold.:eek:

A. Spruce
Re: Build your own cabinets
waltdeckhouse wrote:

OH yeah...forgot to mention. In our prefvious house we has a metal fireplace flue. We used to have a woodpecker show up everymorning about 6 AM pecking on the metal parts. I don't think he wan motivated by bugs for that situation either.

And, yes, the sound was something to behold.:eek:

Back on the ranch, by 6:01 AM, that sound would have been punctuated with a shotgun blast! Consider it a permanent "snooze" button. :D

waltdeckhouse
Re: Build your own cabinets

I have a firplace chimney that is in the center of the house. The structure had some features in it for routing power and a vent. Now that I removed them I would like to patch things up. Here is the back of the fireplace

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v468/waltdeckhouse/bricks/?action=view&current=DCP_4067.jpg

and the side

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v468/waltdeckhouse/bricks/?action=view&current=DCP_4066.jpg

here is a closeup of the hole on the rear

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v468/waltdeckhouse/bricks/?action=view&current=DCP_4072.jpg

and the hole on the side

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v468/waltdeckhouse/bricks/?action=view&current=DCP_4065-1.jpg

so my quesiton is

1. do i remove all the damaged bricks and replace?

2. How do i treat the new brick? butter all sides, insert and then jam more material in there and tool?

3. do i go to HD and buy a bag of mortar mix or is there something else I should use?

thanks for any help

-Walt

goldhiller
Re: Build your own cabinets

Walt,

60/40 should work fine on African Mahogany. Works great for me anyway. Pine and similar are *questionable*. Usually sucks up in an erratic manner and so requires numerous/innumerable coats to achieve the desired build. I avoid using it consequently and choose a film finish instead.

Will try to have a look/see at your chimney thing soonish...... but maybe not tonight yet.

Hope all is well with you and yours.

Blue Moon
Re: Build your own cabinets
waltdeckhouse wrote:

so my quesiton is

1. do i remove all the damaged bricks and replace?

2. How do i treat the new brick? butter all sides, insert and then jam more material in there and tool?

3. do i go to HD and buy a bag of mortar mix or is there something else I should use?

thanks for any help

-Walt

1. Yes. Then you have to get the surrounding bricks wet (NOT DRIPPING--use a spray bottle), and dampen the new ones before you put them in so the mortar will adhere to it. A lot of people don't know to do this, and the mortar hits that brick and dries out too quickly and it doesn't seal properly.

2. Yes, plus use a "pastry" bag to shoot some in around the sides. Must be sealed all the way around. HD "should" have this pastry bag. No, don't use the one the wife uses for birthday cakes...Clean off the new mortar on the brick really well before it hardens, or you'll have a big fat mess.

3. You can...but ask about the hardner they carry, too. It's liquid and kind of spendy.

Please be forewarned that chances are more than likely your new mortar is not going to match the old. There are ways of having the original mortar analyzed to find out its true content--they get so specific they can tell you which quarry the stone dust came out of--but in a case like this, it's really not worth the effort.

Good luck and happy mudding!

Blue Moon--news reports of my death have been highly exaggerated...

waltdeckhouse
Re: Build your own cabinets

Moon,

Thanks for the info. I really appreciate the help.

Also...glad to hear you have not expired :0)

I have been using a hammer to break away the old stuff. Now that I have to remove old mortar and NOT break nearby bits what kind of tool should I use? Is there some kind of big honkin' chisel that I need? My small chisels don't seem to work...mostly cause I can't get a good swing of the hammer on them.

I broke off an outer layer on on a section of one brick. Should I go ahead and replace that one...or is there some easy way to stick the broken bit back on? The bit is about 1.5"x1.5"x.25" thick.

I am not too worried about matching the mortar. Anything would be better than the mess that is there now. Although whoever did the inial job did not clean up and there is mortar speckled everywhere on the surrounding brick. I don't suppose there is some way to get that old stuff off???

Also...are all bricks the same? I found some bricks laying outside the house that I was planning on using for these patches. The ones in the chimney seem...less porous??? The chimney ones seem fully dense whereas these others seem not so. Am i just imagining things? Other then that they seem to match with color and size.

BTW...this whole thing started with me just trying to finish out some trim work. Holy cow...everything turns into a project :0)

Blue Moon
Re: Build your own cabinets

Walt, walt, walt... Why you gotta do things the hard way, dude?

Are you talking about the mortar still left in the hole where you removed the old/broken bricks? You don't have to remove all the old mortar. Quit trying to be a perfectionist and you'll be a lot happier! :rolleyes: There is an acid you can buy that will assist you with cleaning off that old mortar that someone splashed all over, but it's MUCH worse than just maybe sanding/filing it off (gently) or something. I think it's the hydrachloric stuff and it's NASTY. Don't go there.

No, there is NOT a way to fix that chip. Either live with it, or remove the brick and replace. Sorry. No, superglue will not work. Trust me.

No, not all bricks are the same. Ya gots yer pavers, ya gots yer inside chimney bricks, ya gots extruded, ya gots...well, they's different. If'n you ain't all that worried about matching, I'd just use the same thing ya gots. I think the ones ya gots outside are probably pavers. The chimney bricks are a little softer. Maybe the ones you have outside are from a bbq or something--if you think the ones in your chimney are more dense?

Chimney 101: Usually, the bricks on the inside of the chimney are the cheaper bricks--they're the ones that didn't get fired completely, so they tend to be softer. Your chimney is actually at least two wythes' thick (yes, that's how those chimney guys spell that...I would say "widths" but I'm not a chimney guy. Maybe Santa knows? He's the ULTIMATE CHIMNEY GUY!), and will be funky colored bricks--usually that creamy yellow stuff. Anyway, the outside ones are fired more and do appear to be less porous and are "nicer" bricks to look at.

Pavers tend to be extruded (actually, I think ALL brick is extruded now) and hard--well, you walk, drive, etc. on them, so they have to be fired longer and sometimes are a different type of clay.

Personally speaking, I don't think it's going to hurt anything if you use the bricks from outside to do this. It looks like (from your photos) that this is just the external chimney part anyway, and it's not like there's a big chance for smoke to come through and make everyone cough out a lung. Clean the bricks well if they happen to have mold/mildew on them (use some bleach) and rinse well.

One of the classes I had, we were told to actually soak the bricks you were putting in--it helped the mortar stay pliable and it didn't dry out so fast. I don't know if this actually helped any, but you DO need to get the surrounding area and the brick you're installing wet, or the mortar will not stick.

Okay, I don't want this post to sound like "someone else" wrote it, so I'm ending it for now.:cool:

Cheers!

Moon, back on the job and damn glad of it.

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