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JLMCDANIEL
Re: Build your own cabinets

Perhaps you need to sharpen the chisel edges on the mortiser. And here's a picture of a french cleat half mounted on brick

Jack

waltdeckhouse
Re: Build your own cabinets

uuuuhhhh, boy.

We are now considering making the mantle out of concrete.

Just when things seemed reasonable.

I will really need to spend some time lamenting how to mount that to the brick. and how to lighten up the whole thing.

like I said...uuuuhhh boy.

-W

Debra
Re: Build your own cabinets
waltdeckhouse wrote:

uuuuhhhh, boy.

We are now considering making the mantle out of concrete.

Just when things seemed reasonable.

I will really need to spend some time lamenting how to mount that to the brick. and how to lighten up the whole thing.

like I said...uuuuhhh boy.

-W

Well, I would make a floating shelf use the screws/bolts designed to go into the mortar to make a cleat then stucco the shelf. That will give you the look of concrete you want without the weight.

I went searching through my books and print outs and found this, printed from the internet when I was hanging a sign for a business I used to work for.

Quote:

Why drill into mortar vs. the brick/stone for the bracket hole? If a hole is drilled into the brick, the brick may split when the bolt is tightened into the lag shield. Besides, if you ever wanted to remove the bolt, it is a lot easier to fill a mortar hole than a hole into brick or stone.
Which mortar joint? Usually it is the second horizontal 2nd mortar joint below the sill. If that is still not enough clearance, but you do not wish to have more than 1 ½” between the bottom of the sill and the top of the box, use a vertical mortar joint. This is more difficult to make sure all holes are level, but will keep your box closer to the sill.
What kind of drill do I need? An electric hammer drill will make the job easier. They rent inexpensively.
What size drill will I need? A 5/8" concrete drill bit.
Caulk the hole before inserting anything. After drilling the holes, fill them half way with masonry repair caulking using a standard caulking gun.
Proper lag shield orientation. Insert the lag shield so the halves line up with the bricks. This will allow the halves of the shield to spread up against the bricks or stones. That is far better than “pushing” against the softer, more crumbly mortar. Sometimes it may take a hammer to tap the lag shield into the hole.

source

I know the pieces I used had a molly screw set up made for concrete.

havanagranite
Re: Build your own cabinets
waltdeckhouse wrote:

uuuuhhhh, boy.

We are now considering making the mantle out of concrete.

Just when things seemed reasonable.

I will really need to spend some time lamenting how to mount that to the brick. and how to lighten up the whole thing.

like I said...uuuuhhh boy.

-W

there was a guy by the name of clayton allen in northern michigan years ago who used to make that very thing he started out with blocks of styrofoam fastened to a 2x which would eventually be used to fasten to brick above the fireplace. he used a mesh much like they use for synthetic stucco and put on layers of concrete which he then embeded slices of rock to make it look like a rock mantle. I just don't remember exactally how he did it all but he installed a lot of them.

Eric1435
Re: Build your own cabinets

Here you go. Started in July of '05 and now over 800 posts long. It is the longest running thread TOH has ever had, and it's been a great ride.

http://boards.pathfinder.com/[email protected]/0

Hopefully the Moderators are able to save this thread in some form for this new site. It would be such a shame to lose all the info that has been passed along over the years. At the very least, we'll try to get Walt to repost the link to his photo album of the process.

I tried this link today and it no longer appears to work. Is the thread that this linked to gone for good? I was reading bits and pieces when I had time but hadn't finished. Can anybody else still get back to the old thread?

Thanks

A. Spruce
Re: Build your own cabinets
Eric1435 wrote:

Here you go. Started in July of '05 and now over 800 posts long. It is the longest running thread TOH has ever had, and it's been a great ride.

http://boards.pathfinder.com/[email protected]/0?

Thanks

Yep, Walt has been at that project for a while. It does look like the original site is now gone, I've tried links that I have as well and all are dead. I also contacted the moderators when they first opened up this new forum with your same request, to somehow preserve that thread. It's a shame to have lost that info, the good news is that most of us that gave input are still here and still answer similar questions.

Eric1435
Re: Build your own cabinets

It sure is a shame to lose all the info, but good to hear that most of the original group are still around. I was going to look thru the link to see if any discussions centered around pre finished plywood for the cabinet cases. It looked like Walt used solid mahagony for everything? I live in between Milwaukee and Chicago and thought I would be close to some good sources for the plywood but the only option I seem to have is maple. Does anybody know of other wood options available in pre finished plywood in other parts of the country?

A. Spruce
Re: Build your own cabinets

I've never seen prefinished plywood before, so I couldn't help other than to say to locate a cabinet shop or a woodworking supplier in your area. The problem I see with trying to use a prefinished product is that you're going to have cut edges, as well as face frames and door/drawer fronts and matching the finish of a prefinished material could be tough. That prefinish may also be incompatible with whatever finish you decide to use on the aforementioned items.

Just a thought

Eric1435
Re: Build your own cabinets

I watched all the Dream Kitchen episodes of New Yankee Workshop and liked the pre finished plywood product Norm used. You are right that matching the finish on the face frames and doors might be a problem, but having a durable, stain and water resistent finish already applied is pretty tempting. It is also availabe in different widths and thicknesses for drawer construction with one edge factory finished so all that is left is cutting to length, rabbeting for the drawer bottom and assembling using any method desired. It certainly seemed worth investigating.

goldhiller
Re: Build your own cabinets

Erich,

Aetna has pre-finished birch and maple plywood..........but you need an account with them to purchase. Or...know someone who has an account and have them acquire for you.

http://www.aetnaplywood.com/

If you're looking for some other species that comes to you prefinished........you might consider buying what you desire and have a local cabinet/furniture shop pre-finish it for you. Same end result, not? Maybe better because then you have more control/say over what type of finish and/or stain color is used.

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