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LorraineRasmussen
Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

Electric Sub-panel: Have searched everywhere. Any clue as to where it may be located in a re-wired 1913 house. Could it be located anywhere? Maybe on an exterior wall? Is there a way to locate it other than using a circuit tracing device?

Typically would a small (under 1400sf) home have a sub-panel? I've blown a couple of circuits using a space heater and cannot seem to get the outlets working after switching the main and all breakers.

So I'm thinking there must be a sub-panel unless the outlets were burnt? If it is possible that the outlets are ruined would it mean replacing just the outlets or also the wiring?

Thank you,
"Electrically Clueless"

kentvw
Re: Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

Do not know if you would have a sub panel or not but I would think that if you did you would have a breaker in the main panel marked "sub panel".

Try this:

In the main panel turn the breakers off and push them VERY hard to the off position before trying to reset them to the on position.

Also:

Any of the outlets near or in a bathroom? If so check ALL of the outlets in bathrooms, basement, garage and outside to see if they are a GFCI type of receptacle with test/reset buttons.

LorraineRasmussen
Re: Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

Thank you for the advice.

I had a strong person reset the circuit breakers.........no luck

and we've also reset the GFCI's. Would there be a reason to have to reset all of the GFCI's? (Just in case we missed one)

The re wiring job done on this house is the worst workmanship possible which I am sure is part of the reason we are having this problem.

Any other suggestions?

I'm thinking I'm going to need to get a circuit breaker locator to find the sub panel.

Thank you again for responding to my questions kentvw

kentvw
Re: Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

The type of tester you would need to trace dead wiring behind your walls is a very expensive piece of equipment.

IMHO you would be better off to purchase an inexpensive meter or tester for line voltage and test all of the breakers in the main panel first.

Or better yet have an electrician do this for you. He should also be able to tell if you have a sub panel and locate it for you.

You looked in the basement? (If you have one.) You checked the attic?

djohns
Re: Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

Have you looked inside closets or other storage rooms ? These are convenient places to place a panel . The attic ? Crawl space ? Garage ? Stranger things have happened .

LorraineRasmussen
Re: Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

I've looked up and down in every nook and cranny. I've moved furniture. There is only a very tight crawl space underneath the house and ~one foot of attic.:(

kentvw
Re: Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

How well are the breakers in the panel identified? Is there a written description of what each one is for?

If so, do any of the descriptions match the receptacles that are not working?

LorraineRasmussen
Re: Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

No descriptions on the panel. That would be too easy!

kentvw
Re: Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

Well, I feel your pain. If you are not comfortable with taking the cover off of the panel and the use of some voltage testing equipment I do not know if there is much else you can do besides calling an electrical contractor.

LorraineRasmussen
Re: Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

Well thank you for offering some ideas on what to try.

I just wanted to make the attempt before calling an electrician

wireman
Re: Blown circuits in very old 1913 Home

If there really isn't a supanel, then it could be loose or broken wiring in the receptacle box. This doesn't necessarily cause the breaker to trip. If you feel comfortable trying this... Turn the main breaker off in your panel and then remove the receptacle from the outlet box that was the problem one. Look to see if the wires are loose or not. That would at least give you more perspective on the problem. Also, if you did have a sub panel hiding somewhere, it would be commonly fed by a two pole breaker (one with two handles tied together, if the tie is still there) and it could be a 30, 60, 70, or 100 amp breaker.
Hope this helps.

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