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RandyHillyard
Bathroom walls

My wife and I are planning on putting Masonite panels over our existing bathroom walls. One reason is because every wall in the house is painted with textured paint. This makes cleaning a real problem. My question is; can I put a layer of Tyvec or something between the masonite and drywall to help cut down air infiltration?

Thanks in advance.

canuk
Re: Bathroom walls
RandyHillyard wrote:

My wife and I are planning on putting Masonite panels over our existing bathroom walls. One reason is because every wall in the house is painted with textured paint. This makes cleaning a real problem. My question is; can I put a layer of Tyvec or something between the masonite and drywall to help cut down air infiltration?

Thanks in advance.

Please explain your concern ???

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Bathroom walls

Masonite is probably the LAST product to use in a bathroom due to the humidity. You'll have severe expansion and contraction issues. The masonite will bow to the point it will pull itself from the nails used to put them up. Gluing it up will not make any difference.

A better choice would be to use FRP, fiberglas Reinforced Panels which get glued into place and make cleaning a breeze. They make H shaped channels to get the seams to stay mated, as well as corner pieces to do the same. FRP is normally used in commercial applications.

A better descrition of your problems, goal, and budget would be helpful.

ordjen
Re: Bathroom walls

I would have to agree that FRP lookis more at home in the restroom of your local Chevron station.

Most tacked-on products look just that - tacked on!

Just how much texture is on the walls? Light to moderate texture can be covered with a skim coating of drywall mud and sanded with a sanding block followed by priming and painting.

You might actually consider ripping out the walls and re-drywalling. The material costs of drywalling would not be greatly diffent than FRP or some such product. A bonus would be that you could take the opportunity to upgrade electrical, insulation, etc. while the walls are open. Such things are done relatively easily and inexpensively when the walls are open.

The ceiling is the messiest part. You might consider either leaving it as is, or going right over it with drywall using longer screws into the joists.

It is also possible to laminate thin drywall over the existing walls, but this puts all the woodwork trim at the wrong level to the wall and it would have to be shimmed out to the new wall thickness.

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