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bean_counter67
Bathroom Fan - When to replace?

I installed a Nutone fan about 8 years ago rated for 100 cfm. The performance went down hill fairly rapidly over the past 6 months. I finally did the tissue test to see if it would hold, of course it didn't! The fan has subsequently been cleaned along with the discharge pipe. The air being drawn out is marginally holding the tissue paper.

How do you really know when enough is enough and replace the unit?

Is there any advantages in buying a fan for greater than 100 cfm's when the bathroom really does not need it? The configuration is roughly 80sqft with just a hopper and a shower/bath combo. Something I have been looking is manufactured by a company called FanTech. The cfm is overkill at 230 but the thought was to put an exhaust port within the shower alcove and then another port with a light in the main run of the bathroom.

Any insight and guidance would be appreciated.

Re: Bathroom Fan - When to replace?
bean_counter67 wrote:

I installed a Nutone fan about 8 years ago rated for 100 cfm. The performance went down hill fairly rapidly over the past 6 months. I finally did the tissue test to see if it would hold, of course it didn't! The fan has subsequently been cleaned along with the discharge pipe. The air being drawn out is marginally holding the tissue paper.

How do you really know when enough is enough and replace the unit?

Is there any advantages in buying a fan for greater than 100 cfm's when the bathroom really does not need it? The configuration is roughly 80sqft with just a hopper and a shower/bath combo. Something I have been looking is manufactured by a company called FanTech. The cfm is overkill at 230 but the thought was to put an exhaust port within the shower alcove and then another port with a light in the main run of the bathroom.

Any insight and guidance would be appreciated.

Most Bathroom fans move just enough air to vent the space. At best most bathroom fans will not stand up to a tissue test as you stated. Before you replace the whole fan and housing you can just order a replacement motor fan assembly for your fan. Very seldom do you see a bath fan fail. I my opinion you do not need a larger fan as you only have about 640 cubic feet. In 7 min. you have changed the air in the room. But that is a opinion not a profesional answer as I am not a mechanical engineer

A. Spruce
Re: Bathroom Fan - When to replace?

I agree with Raven, check into replacing the motor first before swapping out the housing and related ducting. I've done this many times with older units that would have been a real pain to replace. Motors are easy and plentiful.

If you don't get anywhere with the manufacturer in getting a new motor, look in the phone book for local companies that specialize in electric motor repair. That is where I got the replacement motors for my applications. They will need your current motor to cross reference a replacement.

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