Home>Discussions>INTERIORS>Molding & Carpentry>Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes
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Trillium
Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

We took out old drywall in bathroom and put in recessed cans from Home Depot that have a seal to keep out humidity. We also have a Broan OXT series ventilation fan we also bought from Home Depot.

We watched a TOH video on how to install drywall on a ceiling with Tom Silva and he used a spiral scroll saw for cutting holes for the recessed cans. It was a good video but the problem we are having is that the fan and the lights have lips on the units so even if we go out and buy a spiral saw to cut it like the video shows it will only cut to the inside dimensions of the lights and fan. The lips on the fan and lights will prevent the units from pushing through the drywall and allowing the covers to attach properly to the units. The cans we bought were for new construction but they still have a small lip to them.

We had installed the fan two years prior with old drywall but the attic space is so narrow and we had a difficult time installing it and just ended up gerry rigging it knowing we will be replacing drywall. So trying to install them after putting up drywall is not good option. Plus we already installed them to the joists.

Since the cans have a smaller lip to them I can see where somehow we can widdle away where they will pass through the dry wall but the fan has wider lip and not as easy. If we do this then there will be significant gap and do we caulk this to prevent heat loss? Any suggestions as to how to widdle away without too much damage to housing? The fan lips even have holes in the lip to secure it to drywall. We picked this fan because it had the most features we needed. I don't think they make these fans with these options for new construction. I read on another posting that someone cut the lips off the fan housing and not sure how to go about that. It's too bad Broan hasn't addressed this yet.

Is the spiral scroll saw the best option to cut out any drywall holes? We have a dremel and I wondered if there is an attachment for Dremel that would work as well. We also have a router and wondered if there is an attachment that wouldn't rip up the can housing? Since we are slowly remodeling if spiral scroll saw is best option then would anyone recommend one brand over another and/or one model over another and why?

A. Spruce
Re: Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

Not quite sure I understand the problem.

You need a hole to accommodate lighting and a fan, correct? So cut the holes. Use whatever you want, but you don't need any special tools or devices other than a keyhole saw or drywall jab saw. Mark the perimeter of the hole, cut, install the drywall, tape up any gaps with joint tape and drywall compound. It is no harder than that. :cool:

Trillium
Re: Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

Thanks for your reply. Anyone else have any better suggestions?

Gizmo
Re: Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

My suggestion is the same as Spruce's......Its not a big deal just cut it out
Look at the link below its all you need.

http://www.amazon.com/Mintcraft-Drywall-Hole-Duragr-31101/dp/B000KKX14C/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1259623658&sr=8-2

A. Spruce
Re: Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

It's not fine woodworking. Professionals don't worry about tight joints or cuts around penetrations. That is not to say that they just hack big gaping holes into everything, but any gap less than a quarter inch can be mudded without tape, particularly when the escucheon (face plate, cover plate, beauty ring ) will cover.

Your wanting to do the job as neat and tidy as possible is commendable, but unwarranted in this instance. Put your attentions to detail into the taping and texturing.

NEC
Re: Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

Sorry Tillium........... Fellow members seem to make light of measuring and cutting holes in drywall.......

Consider though that people have cut holes in drywall for many years with little more than a knife and saw and tape measure.

Using these three simple tools can be very complex in this day and age.

I know. Something like 24 and 5/16" x 43 and 1/4" can be a math problem most do not have an answer to.

havanagranite
Re: Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

use your roto zip and cut from the middle out to the edge then hop the bit over to the out side of the can going in a counter clockwise motion go around the can. going counter clockwise will hold the bit to the can and it won't go wild on you.

Gizmo
Re: Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

You can cut the holes with a Dremel tool also if you have one. Theres less chance it will get away from you like the roto zip can if your not use to power tool.

Trillium
Re: Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

Thanks to all of you for your input. I have to agree that we thought it had to be a tight fit and more exact than it really needs to be. I think we should be able to handle this just fine with what we have. Tonight we should be able to cut out and install at least one piece after work. We appreciate all the thoughtful responses.

Timothy Miller
Re: Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

Howdy just read a trick to rub crayon on the fixture surface and press the sheet of drywall against the area this marks the rock where you need to cut out the holes . I will try this as sounds so helpful...

Trillium
Re: Bath fan, recessed cans, new drywall, how to cut out holes

That's a great idea. We did more prep work last night and didn't get to hanging any drywall on ceiling. But tonight for sure. I like the concept of putting something on the recessed can or fan and touching the drywall to the surface to get an outline of where to cut. After your suggestion of crayons I thought of using an ink pad or something else instead to get a better print on the drywall paper. Crayon may take more work to get it to mark the paper. But the concept in general sounds very good especially if you want to get a more exact fit if you don't do this a lot.

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