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Keller425
Basic plane
Keller425

I've just moved into a new home and am tackling a bunch of rehab projects. I was looking for a basic plane to do a little bit of wall scribing and touching up some mitre work. I'd like to buy one good plane for small projects -- I don't need to level any boards or anything at this point. I was wondering if I should opt for a 6-inch low-angle plane, or if a 9-inch bench plane would be easier to use. Both models I'm looking at are by Stanley. Any advice would be much appreciated!

A. Spruce
Re: Basic plane
A. Spruce

Depends on the types of projects you're going after. I have to say though, having been a life long tradesman and woodworker, I can count on one hand how many times I've needed a hand plane to do something. There are a lot of other tools that are faster, easier to use.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Basic plane
Sombreuil_mongrel

Hi,
May I recommend buying used planes. You will save at least half. Get a low-angle block plane, and a #4 bench plane. Buy a stanley, sargent, or even an old sears or wards brands. They are all serviceable. Then, learn how to sharpen them. Look up the "scary sharp" technique, it's a good jumping-off point.
If you do buy new planes, you will need to get decent irons for them; the new planes have crappy irons; if you spend the extra for Hock brand blades, you'll not regret it.
Casey

jkirk
Re: Basic plane
jkirk

very good points casey, the low angle block planes work well for tuning mitres, a regular block plane or a smooth plane are good for scribing.

when it comes to sharpening the "mirror finish" is what you want to achieve, created by flattening the iron. you also have to flatten the bottom of the plane itself. it makes for a smoother cut. as for after market irons, lee valley's "veritas" line is the cream of the crop next toe lie nielson planes or a record

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