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johnjh2o
Re: Basement Smell!

I would call a plumber. The best way to introduce into the system is through a outside clean out plug. But I have also used the vent stack on the roof. The main thing is to do it from outside the home. That way any smoke you see inside the home is coming from your source of the sewer gas leak.

John

dj1
Re: Basement Smell!
<a href="mailto:[email protected]" rel="nofollow">[email protected]</a> wrote:

How do we do this?? Does a plumber come test it or the people who installed our septic? This sounds like a decent place to start...

To add to John's idea:

A plumber will have all the necessary equipment to perform a smoke test, including a smoke device and a forced air pump. Within minutes you'll see the smoke coming out of any opening in the sewer line.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Basement Smell!

If the plumber doesn't have the equipment for a smoke test, or has never done one, get a new plumber.

johnjh2o
Re: Basement Smell!
HoustonRemodeler wrote:

If the plumber doesn't have the equipment for a smoke test, or has never done one, get a new plumber.

Actually guys the equipment we use is not that high tech. It's a 5 gallon bucket and a shop vac with a suction and discharge hose. We drop a smoke bomb into the bucket and suck the smoke out through the shop vac and into the plumbing system. It works great. We once used it in a three story hotel to find a leak behind a wall in a old cast iron vent line.

John

Re: Basement Smell!
johnjh2o wrote:

Actually guys the equipment we use is not that high tech. It's a 5 gallon bucket and a shop vac with a suction and discharge hose. We drop a smoke bomb into the bucket and suck the smoke out through the shop vac and into the plumbing system. It works great. We once used it in a three story hotel to find a leak behind a wall in a old cast iron vent line.

John

I found a simple step by step guide to doing this on google..so we are going to try this. Is the white "curved" tube on the roof where we want to introduce the smoke bomb to??

Re: Basement Smell!
<a href="mailto:[email protected]" rel="nofollow">[email protected]</a> wrote:

I found a simple step by step guide to doing this on google..so we are going to try this. Is the white "curved" tube on the roof where we want to introduce the smoke bomb to??

So when you found that leak behind the old cast iron vent how did that get fixed?

johnjh2o
Re: Basement Smell!
<a href="mailto:[email protected]" rel="nofollow">[email protected]</a> wrote:

I found a simple step by step guide to doing this on google..so we are going to try this. Is the white "curved" tube on the roof where we want to introduce the smoke bomb to??

The vent pipe shouldn't be a white curved tube. It should just extend 10 to 12 inches through the roof. If someone put a fitting on it after it exits the roof this can be part of your problem. I also hope your not going to just drop the smoke bomb down the vent. Sewer gas is flammable. If your not even sure what a vent pipe looks like I don't think it would be wise for you to attempt doing it. You are way over your head on this I would advise you to call a plumber. As far as what we did to repair a failed line we replaced it.

John

dj1
Re: Basement Smell!

At this point it sounds like you'd be better off getting a pro to do this job. Don't compromise your safety for a 'fistfull of dollars'.

Your roof has a few vents and you need to know which one is what.

But if you have a clean out in the ground, better use that.

ed21
Re: Basement Smell!

That curved pipe on the roof could be to the furnace. The "over your head" statement may be correct. Don't make more problems than you already have. There's no shame in admitting a problem needs a professional to diagnose or fix. It's also good to at least try to DIY.

jled96
Re: Basement Smell!

When I worked as an apprentice electrician I have also seen old houses that were remodeled in which the plumbing lines (sewer) were leaking in the basement for years, mostly owned by elderly or disabled people, or landlords that just rented them out. My point is that the water would absorb into the concrete and soil, and everytime it was damp it would smell pretty nasty down there, I would tell the person they had a leak and there response usally was its been leaking for many years and I have no money to fix it. So if you find no vent issues I would check under that carpet and see if the smell is coming up from the ground.Good Luck!

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