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vikasintl
Baseboard heater wiring connection

I want to change the thermostat from single pole to double pole and problem is supply wires coming from panel has only two wires ..it does not have ground wire ...so what is the solution? we are not ready to rewire whole house or open the walls to change even one wire coming to baseboard heater...is there any other easier solution??? for :confused:

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Baseboard heater wiring connection

Not enough information supplied. Are the heaters 240 or 120 volt? Does the cable go from the panel to the thermostat and another cable from the thermostat to the heaters?

Jack

vikasintl
Re: Baseboard heater wiring connection
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Not enough information supplied. Are the heaters 240 or 120 volt? Does the cable go from the panel to the thermostat and another cable from the thermostat to the heaters?

Jack

Sorry...its 240 Volts.

There is one cable coming from panel to heater...no cable in between thermostat and heater..just wires...

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Baseboard heater wiring connection

Then both wires are hot. If you are installing a 240 volt thermostat you will need 4 wires between the heater and the thermostat. 2 will be to carry the two hots to the thermostat and 2 returns to carry power to the heater, or just use on set of contacts to control one hot if you only have only 2 wires. I would prefer the 4 wire hook up myself.

Jack

vikasintl
Re: Baseboard heater wiring connection
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Then both wires are hot. If you are installing a 240 volt thermostat you will need 4 wires between the heater and the thermostat. 2 will be to carry the two hots to the thermostat and 2 returns to carry power to the heater, or just use on set of contacts to control one hot if you only have only 2 wires. I would prefer the 4 wire hook up myself.

Jack

Thanks but am wondering when there is no ground coming out with supply wires..(only two hot) what should I do to be safe (to fix not having ground problem)?

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Baseboard heater wiring connection

Having a ground wire adds practically no safety. It's purpose is to trip the breaker if a hot wire gets damaged and shorts to ground. On a 15 amp circuit that would require 15 amps going to ground, it takes less than ½ amp through your body to kill you so you would be fried to a crisp before the breaker tripped if the current was going through your body. The best protection is a GFCI breaker or receptacle. While it is called a ground fault circuit interrupter, ground has no function. It measures the current flow in the two leads and will trip if there is a minute difference in current flow. In other words if all the current does not remain contained in the circuit. This provides the greatest amount of personal protection because it will trip well before you recieve a fatal shock.

If you have take notice you would see that about 99% of household elctrical equipment and appliances have only two prongs on their plugs, ther is no ground pin. The exception are devices such as surge suppression power strips and UPS units which require ground as a path to filter surges and electrical noise.

Jack

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