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Bus33
Antique Flooring

I have antique wide-pine floors that have been beaten over the years. I'd like to re-finish them, but fear that there is not enough wood to really sand them down. It's been recommended that we paint them after sanding them lightly, but my wife is against that (read: I need a plan B). Is there any product that we can apply to the floors that will renew the color, but without covering them grain completely? I've been told that there are stains that contain polyurethane, but I'm not completely sure if they exist or if this is the right application.

Debra
Re: Antique Flooring

the sanding isn't really to level the floors. It's to get rid of the finish that is on the floor right now.

You could just wax the floor
apply an polyurethane finish
stain then finish
stain then wax
pickle then finish
I'm sure there are lots of other finishing options. It all depends on color, care and gloss preferences.

goldhiller
Re: Antique Flooring

Are these t&g flooring boards.....or are they squared edged and face-nailed?

If the latter, you should be able to slide a steel rule or similar down between them to determine how much thickness is left. Probe numerous places around the rooma s the floor may have been sanded before and that may have left a varying amount wood thickness.

If the former, you should be able to do the same and determine how much wood is left above the tongues.

Are the boards currently cupped? Significantly or just a little bit?

Some pics might be real helpful to help determine what some of the options are/might be.

Yes, there are polyurethanes available off the shelf with stain/colorant suspended in them. Minwax makes one called Polyshades and Varathane also has one on the market. I'm not a big fan of the Polyshades product to say the least.....and I suspect the Varathane product won't be much different. Neither is rated for floors to the best of my knowledge and no one makes such a critter that is rated for floors....again.......to the best of my knowledge. But what you might do is use one coat of that type product to achieve color and then topcoat with a floor rated and compatible clear product.

A. Spruce
Re: Antique Flooring

IMHO, you need to stay as far away from Minwax polyurethane products as possible. They're difficult to use and result in a poor finish. A far better brand is McKloskey's products, though I do not know if they make one rated for flooring. I would also recommend applying the stain separately from the clear-coat, reason being that if and when the floor gets chipped or scratched, you'll have a "white" spot where the stain chipped out using the combination product, whereas the stain only will penetrate the wood more deeply and color won't be affected by clear-coat abrasion

goldhiller
Re: Antique Flooring
A. Spruce wrote:

IMHO, you need to stay as far away from Minwax polyurethane products as possible. They're difficult to use and result in a poor finish. A far better brand is McKloskey's products, though I do not know if they make one rated for flooring. I would also recommend applying the stain separately from the clear-coat, reason being that if and when the floor gets chipped or scratched, you'll have a "white" spot where the stain chipped out using the combination product, whereas the stain only will penetrate the wood more deeply and color won't be affected by clear-coat abrasion

Agree on all accounts.

Minwax products ain't what they used to be.....20 years ago. But they do have slicker ads on TV and in the mags.

And yup......floors are not a good place to use a color-glaze or colored finish. Mentioned those products because......well....he asked. :)

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Antique Flooring

The best polyurethane I have found for flooring is "Old Masters" polyurethane . It provides a hard durable finish and it has fantastic self leveling properties. If the floor is level and you decide to sand rent a random orbital floor sander rather than a drum sander. It's much easier to use, far less likely to gouge the floor, and a minimal amount or removal is much easier.
Jack

A. Spruce
Re: Antique Flooring
goldhiller wrote:

Agree on all accounts.

Minwax products ain't what they used to be.....20 years ago. But they do have slicker ads on TV and in the mags.

And yup......floors are not a good place to use a color-glaze or colored finish. Mentioned those products because......well....he asked. :)

Wasn't meaning to infer that you were recommending them one way or the other, sorry if that wasn't clear. Just trying to add another $ .02 to the pot. ;)

goldhiller
Re: Antique Flooring

Understood that from the get-go, buddy. :D

I use suspended colorants/glazes/toners all the time on furniture, cabinets, interior millwork, windows, doors, etc.......because I can get beautiful results that you can't get any other way. But on a floor......I don't.... think .......so. It would be the last resort anyway......and against my better judgement and advice.

( I've used Polyshades exactly twice. Ugh. Never again. And the results were far better than the average guy gets with a brush cause I shot it HVLP. There are far better ways to color than Polyshades. )

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