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SCARLAN
Advice on Storm Windows
SCARLAN

I have an old home (was a stage coach inn in 1800’s). Windows have been replaced at some time, but they are drafty. I wonder what are the best storm windows to put in: interior/exterior?, triple track?, aluminum?, etc. The existing base windows are dual hung, wood.

ordjen
Re: Advice on Storm Windows
ordjen

An old home such as yours might have aesthetic considerations. Modern aluminum storm windows can look somewhat out of place on a historical home. They will probably be forbidden in an historical district. Old fashion one piece wooden storms would be look better, although also not technically historically authentic. Here, inside storms might be less objectional.

In terms of ease of maintenance and performance, quality aluminum storms perform well. My last home had wooden, double hung window, single glazed windows. The builder had installed cheap triple track aluminum storms. After a dozen years, they rattled badly in the wind and were difficult to take in and out for cleaning. I replaced them with quality double track, painted factory finish white storms. I requested that they NOT be caulked on, as I removed them whenever I painted the wooden frames. I did do a first class paint job on the frames before the new storms went on, with special attention to clean all the surfaces the new storms would mount to. This gave them a very tight fit. All storm windows do have provisions for venting and drainage, typically two slots in the adjustment strip on the bottom where it meets the sill. NEVER caulk this strip , particularly from the outside. To do so invites rotting of the wooden sill.

I like the double track style aluminum storms because the bottom screen insert firmly holds the upper glass in place, as they share a track, assuring a nice tight fit. They also do not extend outward in depth as much as the triple track, presenting a nicer look from the outside.

drewp
Re: Advice on Storm Windows
drewp

I had a similar situation. I have a turn of the century Victorian home that had drafty, loose fitting, original double hung windows. The previous owner had aluminum storm windows installed on the outside. They also rattled and iced up at times. I elected to replace the existing wood windows with a new, jamb liner kit. The existing sashes, jambs/stops, weights, etc were removed and new jamb "liners" were installed in the existing opening. THen, two new wooden sashes were hung. I'm a little handy so I did it myself as I had time. We are happy with the result EXCEPT some of the old windows had the wavey looking glass (as old windows do). This was lost with the new sashes. ALSO, if you have any windows with true divided lights, I don't think you can get that old, original look back when using replacements (usually a snap in grid,etc)

SCARLAN
Re: Advice on Storm Windows
SCARLAN
ordjen wrote:

An old home such as yours might have aesthetic considerations. Modern aluminum storm windows can look somewhat out of place on a historical home. They will probably be forbidden in an historical district. Old fashion one piece wooden storms would be look better, although also not technically historically authentic. Here, inside storms might be less objectional.

In terms of ease of maintenance and performance, quality aluminum storms perform well. My last home had wooden, double hung window, single glazed windows. The builder had installed cheap triple track aluminum storms. After a dozen years, they rattled badly in the wind and were difficult to take in and out for cleaning. I replaced them with quality double track, painted factory finish white storms. I requested that they NOT be caulked on, as I removed them whenever I painted the wooden frames. I did do a first class paint job on the frames before the new storms went on, with special attention to clean all the surfaces the new storms would mount to. This gave them a very tight fit. All storm windows do have provisions for venting and drainage, typically two slots in the adjustment strip on the bottom where it meets the sill. NEVER caulk this strip , particularly from the outside. To do so invites rotting of the wooden sill.

I like the double track style aluminum storms because the bottom screen insert firmly holds the upper glass in place, as they share a track, assuring a nice tight fit. They also do not extend outward in depth as much as the triple track, presenting a nicer look from the outside.

Thanks for the feed back! Can you tell me the brand of windows you used. I'm looking at Larson **** Series or, perhaps, Harveys. Looked at Burches but they won't fit.

ordjen
Re: Advice on Storm Windows
ordjen

Scarlan, It was a long time ago, but I do believe they were Larson stormwindows.

SCARLAN
Re: Advice on Storm Windows
SCARLAN

Orden,

Thanks for the info.

SAC

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