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ted herford
adding ridgid insulation to exterior of home

We have purchased a home build in 1976. It has 2 by 4 walls which gives me R-11 insulation. I would like to increase that and since I am considering new siding at some point, could I add 2 by 2 firing on the exterior (with siding removed of course) and place 1 and 1/2 inch rigid insulation and then the siding.

Any other ideas for increasing the R-value of the walls would be appreciated.

Thanks:)

rrbigdad
Re: adding ridgid insulation to exterior of home

Ted when I had siding put on my house it came with an insulation board under it probley 1/2 inch thick. you could also do a house wrap before that and should seal you up pertty good.

Shubi
Re: adding ridgid insulation to exterior of home
ted herford wrote:

We have purchased a home build in 1976. It has 2 by 4 walls which gives me R-11 insulation. I would like to increase that and since I am considering new siding at some point, could I add 2 by 2 firing on the exterior (with siding removed of course) and place 1 and 1/2 inch rigid insulation and then the siding.

Any other ideas for increasing the R-value of the walls would be appreciated.

Thanks:)

If you can get a sidewall tube up the wall from the outside, you may be able to add dense packed cellulose or blown fiberglass into the wall, increasing to about an R-15, but more importantly providing a better air barrier than rolled fiberglass. Foam insulation can also be pumped into the wall cavities instead, but is more costly than blown fiberglass, which is more costly than cellulose. Most places that rent insulation machines, like Lowe's or Home Depot, look at you as if you're from another planet when you tell them you need a sidewall tube though. Their machines are generally set up and used for loose fill insulation in open joist situations. If you can find the right setup, cellulose should be dense packed to a value of 3 - 3.5 pounds per cubic foot, or blown fiberglass to a value of 1.6 pounds per cubic foot. Don't 1 inch blow it if you can help it, you may not get a good dense pack unless you put 2 -3 holes per cavity on each floor.

foammaster
Re: adding ridgid insulation to exterior of home

injection foam should cost about the same as cellulose, but with a better R-value that won't settle. what ever you put in rigid board should be applied over the studs with no furring to create a "Thermal-Break". Caulk or tape the seams with foil tape to reduce air infiltration.

JB
injectionfoam.com

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