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Guy Gagnon
accurate angles

I am installing molding (not crown) in a bathroom, along walls that vary from 39 to 50 degrees. How do I measure these angles and transfer them accurately to the moldings. I have slide angle tools and a combination mitre saw but I'm in a bit of a quandry on how they should be used (or if they should be used in this case). Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.

A. Spruce
Re: accurate angles

The typical molding is miter cut. Measure the angle and divide by 2. Cut the end of each piece with that angle. Example, a true 90* corner would be two pieces cut at 45*.

50/2=25
39/2=19.5

There are all kinds of tools for accurately measuring a corner. Look at drafting tools at an office supply store.

Another method would be to cope the mating piece. You square cut one and run it from wall to wall. The mate is then coped to fit the face profile of the first piece. How do you find the correct coping profile? You cut a slight angle on the end of the piece to reveal the profile, then you follow that with your coping saw with a slight back angle so that the face butts tightly to the mating surface.

A. Spruce
Re: accurate angles
Guy Gagnon wrote:

Thank you Mr. Spruce for your reply to accurate angles. It appears that a protractor is what I need. The Starrett protractor/angle finder looks ideal but a little bit pricey. For such a small job I am wondering if I could possibly just line up my T-bevel on my combination saw. what do you think?

Let's go back to my example above. Say you have a corner that is give or take 90*. Start by cutting two pieces of scrap molding at 45* and then fit them to the corner.

If there is a gap at the heel of the cut then you need to decrease the bevel cut a degree or two, recut the scraps, then test fit them again.

If the gap is at the tip of the cut, then you need to increase your bevel cut by a degree or two.

Fencepost
Re: accurate angles

I thought about this for several minutes and then came up with this. So as you can imagine, I haven't tried it.

Set your T-bevel to the angle of the corner. Transfer this to a piece of paper; cut it out so the cut edge of the paper fits into an inside corner, or around an outside corner.

Now fold the paper in half starting at the corner and mating the cut edges that touch the wall; the angle between the edge and the fold will be the angle to set you miter saw at.

Works for both inside and outside corners, but outside corners might take a little more thinking. No math necessary; no need to know how many degrees the corner is.

dj1
Re: accurate angles
Fencepost wrote:

I thought about this for several minutes and then came up with this. So as you can imagine, I haven't tried it.

Set your T-bevel to the angle of the corner. Transfer this to a piece of paper; cut it out so the cut edge of the paper fits into an inside corner, or around an outside corner.

Now fold the paper in half starting at the corner and mating the cut edges that touch the wall; the angle between the edge and the fold will be the angle to set you miter saw at.

Works for both inside and outside corners, but outside corners might take a little more thinking. No math necessary; no need to know how many degrees the corner is.

This is a good one !

A. Spruce
Re: accurate angles

Guy, go into your user profile and allow private messages.

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