Home>Discussions>DOORS & WINDOWS>3 season room: sealing up doors
5 posts / 0 new
Last post
Tunelowplayhard
3 season room: sealing up doors
Tunelowplayhard

We have a 3 season room with French doors that open into the room. During the extremely cold weather, we close off this room so that we don't have to heat this area. The issue is that there is a very cold draft pouring in below the doors. What would be an appropriate solution to seal this area? The room is carpeted and the adjoins room is hardwood. I also would like to seal the area where the doors come together as well. I will post s pic to show the configuration.

ed21
Re: 3 season room: sealing up doors
ed21

It sounds like you need a door bottom seal and threshold for it to to seal against. Probably need a whole set of weatherstripping for the door. Or get a door snake to seal the bottom of the door.

dj1
Re: 3 season room: sealing up doors
dj1

The door probably has a bottom seal, which is malfunctioning (dry or damaged), so a new seal is in order.

Mastercarpentry
Re: 3 season room: sealing up doors
Mastercarpentry

To seal effectively some type on weatherstripping is called for. The downside is that it's going to be visible if you go with the usual stuff. A cheap but effective solution here is 1/4" wide stick-on foam tape. It's usually gray but it is made in white if you can find it. This can be applied along the stop molding at the top, but beside it across the hinges on the stiles so the 'sweeping' of the door face doesn't go across it but compresses it instead. The "door snake" at the bottom can be made of any cloth which matches the decor, then filled with 'bean-bag' filler. DIY level 1 stuff.

Best would be an inlet weatherstripping; relatively easy if it's a built-up traditional frame, a big deal if it's the newer 'snap-in' type. On a traditional built-in-place frame just replace the stop molding with the new, caulk, prime, and paint; DIY level2. With a 'snap-in' frame replace it with one for an exterior application; DIY level5. Alternately use a face-applied weatherstrip (DIY level 2) and live with the ugly. For the bottom, the doors can be let for a retractable sweep, which rises out of the way on opening then drops when closed; DIY level 9 as this has to be done perfectly with tools you may not have and a mistake can destroy the door.

I haven't addressed the center which will need an astragal which is a "T" shaped piece attached to one door that the other door abuts when closed. There might be one now; foam tape is the quick fix, replacement with one that has rubber weatherstripping is best however unless you find that piece in an identical size, it can go to DIY level 2 for cutting the door edge on the stationary door to DIY level 4 for doing it on the active door and moving the lockest back an equal amount for a bored-through lock or DIY level 7 for a mortised lock.

Should you decide to hire this out, the cheapest solution is to have the contractor install an exterior-type frame and re-use your existing doors and moldings, then do whatever is needed at the bottom. Keep in mind that with the better sealing you may experience condensation from the glass if the house humidity is high. It's really a simple project if you choose the right options, but that choice will alter the skills and tools needed- go very carefully and you'll do fine.

Phil

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: 3 season room: sealing up doors
Sombreuil_mongrel

A wood saddle 5/8" tall plus a felt "wiper" set into a kerf along the bottom rail would probably be adequate. Bronze interlocking w-stripping would be expensive and overkill. A metal threshold with a vinyl bulb insert would be fugly. A brush type door bottom seal would be a good compromise, as they come in colors and the wood type is paintable, but will still require a wood saddle (threshold).
Casey

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.