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DIY1925
12 inch drop over 2 inches

I just bought a 1925 house. I have a small living room that bows in the middle. From the middle to the far wall the floor drops 1.5 to 2 inches over 12 feet. Anyone ever had to correct this much of a slope? I don't want to use self leveling compound for this since it seems like that would be a lot of weight and a lot of mess. I'm considering using roofing shingles (which i've been recommended elsewhere) or pulling up the tounge and groove and putting down plywood with some shims underneath on the joists. Lastly i could try to jack the house up underneath but i think that might be getting outside my skill level. So if anyone has had any experiance with this kind of a slope i'd appreciate some input.

Thanks much,

Also i'm pretty positive the reason i have the slope is because my foundation has settled, i have an unfinished basement so its easy for me to get down there and look around. My house is an L shaped bungalow, so the living room is the short part of the L and the far end is the area that has sloped.
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marijuana strain strawberry cough

Timothy Miller
Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

howdy if the bow is in the middle of the room then i would install a beam under the bow and install two basement jacks and jack up the beam until the bow is not bowing. The floor joists run perpendicular to the beam and the beam say an 8" by 8" by 8' with each basement jack set 1 foot in from the end of the beam. The jacks have a screw plate that you turn out to jack up the beam and each post/ jack supports 15,000lbs. When jacking the floor up consider only raising it two thread s of additional pressure per day so you allow the structure to adapt without causing some finish cracking...

Timothy Miller
Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

Howdy re read you post and i think you are saying that the floor has settled about 2 inches to the outside wall. There can be several reasons and a few repairs. First go look ans see if the wood sole plate that sits on top of the foundation looks good or if it rotted and or deteriorated. Then is there cracking in the foundation wall ? what type of foundation? Do the floor joists run parallel or perpendicular to the foundation wall at the low side of the floor?

DIY1925
Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

Hey thanks for response, here are a couple more details and a picture! I've checked around the sill before and its not rotten. The foundation just slopes down (i've attached a picture, much easier than describing). The foundation is a concrete slab i believe. As you can see in the photo the floor joists run parallel with the sunken wall. Also as you can see in the photo i have an old coal bed under this part of the house (which i'm guessing is why the floor is kind of slopped since its a lot of extra weight) The second photo is from the same angle upstairs in my living room.

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Honda Vamos

Timothy Miller
Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

Howdy, the photos help. it appears you have osb used as a shear wall on top of the foundation. On the other side of the osb is this more crawl space or basement or the outside of the home? If the other side is inside the house then go around and see if the knee wall -short stud wall is open to view and take a photo . If not then first remove the OSB to expose the knee wall of studs and inspect it. The knee wall is a short stud wall that holds up the floor joist. Take another photo with the osb removed ( chip board- cheap version of plywood- trying to make it less confusing) an post it. If there is a knee wall behind the osb one can install basement steel pole screw jacks and lift up then block between the wall plate and the stud wall.

DIY1925
Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

Thanks again for the response. The other side of the wall is the outside of the house. I'm not familiar with the term OSB but i looked it up and i think i just have regular particle board in place there (i think it was just put there to hold in the batt insulation). I'll tear the boards down from the corner and take a pic of the knee wall either tonight or tommrow to post up. Thanks!
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Yamaha Motif

A. Spruce
Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches
DIY1925 wrote:

Thanks again for the response. The other side of the wall is the outside of the house. I'm not familiar with the term OSB but i looked it up and i think i just have regular particle board in place there (i think it was just put there to hold in the batt insulation). I'll tear the boards down from the corner and take a pic of the knee wall either tonight or tommrow to post up. Thanks!

OSB = Oriented Strand Board, aka wafer board. It is a cheap alternative to plywood.

If the OSB is only holding the insulation in place, the it's not going to be nailed with any great number of fasteners. If it is part of a shear wall, then it will be nailed at least every 6" around the perimeter and 6" to 8" along intermediate studs.

DIY1925
Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

hey guys still working on getting those photos, but also i just realized my posting title is wrong, it should say 2 inch drop over 12 feet, which is what the body of my topic talks about (a 12 inch drop would probably mean my house was gonna fall over ;) )
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og kush

DIY1925
Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

So i pulled back the OSB (says OSB on it :) ) and i got some pictures. The studs and sill are in fine condition so no worries about rot. So what are my options for jacking this thing up an inch or so? Is it possibble just place a jack next to one of the studs, pull out the nail connecting it to the sill and raise it an inch or so (doing the same on the otherside at the same time/rate)?

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volcano vaporizers

sstewart01
Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches
DIY1925 wrote:

I just bought a 1925 house. I have a small living room that bows in the middle. From the middle to the far wall the floor drops 1.5 to 2 inches over 12 feet. Anyone ever had to correct this much of a slope? I don't want to use self leveling compound for this since it seems like that would be a lot of weight and a lot of mess. I'm considering using roofing shingles (which i've been recommended elsewhere) or pulling up the tounge and groove and putting down plywood with some shims underneath on the joists. Lastly i could try to jack the house up underneath but i think that might be getting outside my skill level. So if anyone has had any experiance with this kind of a slope i'd appreciate some input.

Thanks much,

Also i'm pretty positive the reason i have the slope is because my foundation has settled, i have an unfinished basement so its easy for me to get down there and look around. My house is an L shaped bungalow, so the living room is the short part of the L and the far end is the area that has sloped.

You will need to reduce the settlement to less than l/240 ie 12x12/240 for it not to be noticable. if you decide jack which is what I would do use large blocking on top or you will crush the spruce where you attempt to jack the floor. Also be prepared for some othe problems ie doors and windows have adjusted to the settlement and may be jammed after the repair.

Timothy Miller
Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

Howdy, look up between the metal duct and the outside wall at the floor joists are they notched and only part of the joist sitting on top of the wall plate? Or is the entire floor joist sitting on the wall top plate( top plate the horizontal 2 by on top of the knee wall studs)? In your photo the arrow points to the back wall as the sloping down direction if this is true remove the sheer wall to reveal the knee wall there too. Check for level- the cement foundation that the knee wall sits on and the the top plate of the knee wall. in both directions from the corner use a 4' or longer level then write back...

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