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anto
1 tread stairs
anto

I'm looking to replace a set of stairs that were installed by a previous owner. This is a step that leads into the attached garage. It was not made with a stringer, just a 2x10 with some "support" pieces of wood nailed on the inside on which the tread lies.
Another problem is that the full rise is 17". So it's currently comprised of at 7" rise and 10" rise.

Can a single tread set of stairs be made with a proper stringer? And if so, is that a 2 step stringer, each step having a rise of 8.5"?

Thanks for any ideas!

dj1
Re: 1 tread stairs
dj1

"Can a single tread set of stairs be made with a proper stringer? And if so, is that a 2 step stringer, each step having a rise of 8.5"?"

7" riser is the norm. 10" is not.
8.5" is better than 10", but still too high.

You can go with 3 steps.
If you don't like the idea, go with 2 using thinner treads of better grade lumber and add a stringer in the middle.
And don't tell anybody.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: 1 tread stairs
Sombreuil_mongrel

Small indoor stairs can more easily be built as a series of stacked, graduated boxes than as stringers, a plate, and separate treads and risers. (The face of the box is the riser). Riser heights by code may not vary more than 1/4".
Casey

A. Spruce
Re: 1 tread stairs
A. Spruce
Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

Small indoor stairs can more easily be built as a series of stacked, graduated boxes than as stringers

Definitely the easier way to go!

Mastercarpentry
Re: 1 tread stairs
Mastercarpentry

"Stacked box" stair construction is the norm here as well. Just easier and faster giving acceptable results but not the only way to skin the cat.

Inspectors here don't like to see as much as an 8" rise but might accept it based on the situation, especially if it adds safety because of the shorter run. The preferred dimension is between 7" and 7 1/4" rise, going up or down to work with the total. No riser may be more than 1/8" different than an adjacent riser and none of the risers may be more than 3/8" different than any other. Treads 24" or wider width require 3 stringers or supports. Treads must be at least 10 1/2" width.

For the OP, 17" rise total divided by 3 is 5 11/16" risers. 17" divided by 2 is 8 1/2" risers. Neither is optimal and the latter excessively high so I'd go with the former as long as there's enough space for the run, which is 31 1/2" for the former and 21" for the latter. Being in a garage the longer run could render the steps unusable with a car parked inside which might make the latter a safer alternative- you often have to point that out to the inspector before they will OK it.

We've "cheated" on some of these by pouring a small concrete pad on top of the floor at the stair to shorten the dimensions of the risers. The edges of the pour were feathered out as needed to blend. Those thin edges will probably flake and chip in time but it got us past the inspector when nothing else would. One of the less-evident signs of a really good builder is the floor elevation difference here which will more closely match the optimum rise- easy to do by altering the garage floor height at the stair or throughout. Very few guys think that deeply any more, they just put the garage floor in level wherever it happens to land and call it OK.

Phil

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