In This Issue

  • May/
    June
    1997 Issue No. 12

    • New!
    • Tell Us Your Story
      Here's your chance to be featured in the pages of THis Old House magazine — and earn $250
    • Editor Spotlight
      Scott Omelianuk
      Scott Omelianuk, Editor of This Old House magazine, began his long relationship with home improvement at age 15, when he started working after school as a carpenter's gopher. After years of jobsite toil and practical jokes—including being s

      More Editor Bios:
  • Tucson Project: A Dream Comes True

    Features
    Team Tucson
    A short spring TV schedule leaves no time for contractors who aren't willing to work on top of each other or homeowners who aren't willing to make decisions quickly. Thanks to extraordinary teamwork, This Old House polishes off an eight-month renovation in three.
    By Jack McClintock
    Mesquite
    The soul of the Sonoran Desert is hidden beneath the bark of its most prevalent tree. Crafted by cabinetmaker James Vosnos, this precious but stubborn wood becomes the centerpiece of the Tucson project kitchen.
    By Jack McClintock
    Poured Floors
    When is a concrete floor not fine Italian marble? Your friends will never know.
    By Brad Lemley
    An American Craftsman
    Cloaked in smoke and swathed in distorted metallic reflections, coppersmith Larry Stearns devotes his days to shimmering adornments that will endure much longer than he will.
    By Walt Harrington
    Why Is My Paint Peeling?
    Bad paint jobs can happen to good people with old houses? even when they listen faithfully to everything the paint salesman tells them. The reason is a surprising revelation about the compatibility of oil and latex paints.
    By Jeanne Huber
    Zeus on the Loose
    Exploding pipes, airborne fireplaces and vaporized wiring is child's play for 150,000-amp lightning bolts. Without lightning rods, every cupola, dormer and satellite dish on your house wears an electrostatic "Kick Me" sign.
    By Claudia Glenn Dowling
    Nature Wins
    The American obsession with clipped grass is usually a quixotic effort involving massive irrigation and expensive chemicals. For all the heroics, the result is often boring. A Phoenix landscaper gives in to nature, encouraging indigenous plants in a self-sustaining ecosystem teeming with cutters.
    By Sara Stein
    The Poster: First Aid
    When you're fishing through sawdust to find your finger, this is the chart to have at eye level.
    By Larry Katzenstein
    In the Garden
    It may seem crazy, but we're in love with a push mower?an old-fashioned reel mower that doesn't require old-fashioned effort. Also. razzle-dazzle raspberries.
    Around the house
    Off The Wall

    Blinded by Brackets

    Shy glances over the counter, a solemn exchange of wing nuts: Could this be hardware-store love?
    By Jeanne Marie Laskas
    Power Tool

    Slice and Dice

    Smooth edges! Dead-on angles! And it cuts trim in seconds! The sliding compound miter saw is a finish carpenter's favorite tool.
    By Mark Feirer
    Hand Tool

    Reverse Hammering

    It can't extract the shame, but a good cat's paw will keep an errant nail your little secret.
    By Jeff Taylor
    Electrics

    Aiming for Space

    NASA funding pays off: A well-installed satellite dish serves up "Comedy Central," via the stratosphere.
    By William G. Scheller
    Equipment

    Pure and Not So Simple

    If you can't trust the water, at least you can trust the modern technology of home water filters.
    By Brooke Deterline
    Technique

    Easy Breeze

    Installing a ceiling fan can be only slightly more complicated than changing a light bulb.
    By John Kelsey
    Architecture

    This Room Looks Funny

    Learn the classic principles of proportion and visitors won't be able to tell where you added that new family room.
    By Steve Thomas
    Finances

    What's Your House Worth?

    Don't let your neighborhood banker and his appraiser decide without your help.
    By Patricia E. Berry