Introduction

a finished planter
Photo: David Prince
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Whether big or small, used in pairs or on their own, planter boxes are a cheery way to flank an entry, break up an expansive patio, or simply add a splash of color to a small yard. This roomy rectangular version gives you plenty of space for your favorite bloomers, and, knowing that large planters are tough to store during the off-season, This Old House senior technical editor Mark Powers opted to build it from cellular PVC. "The material is easy to cut, it holds up well in heat and cold, and it won't rot when exposed to soil and water,' he says. Beadboard detailing and a bright coat of paint add extra charm during those inevitable April showers, too. Read on to learn how he turned trim and beadboard pieces into an eye-catching landscape accent.

Material: AZEK cellular PVC trim and beadboard

Paint: Custom color by C2 Paint
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    Tools List

    • miter saw
      Miter saw
    • drill
      Drill/driver
    • adjustable clamp
      Clamps
    • tack cloth
      Tack cloth
    • 3-inch wide paint brush
      Paint brush

    Shopping List

    1. Cellular PVC trim boards We used AZEK trim. Get two 12-foot 1x4s and four 12-foot 1x3s. If 1x3s aren't stocked, rip them from 1x4s and use the scrap for the ledges.

    2. Cellular PVC beadboard Choose 5½-inch tongue-and-groove boards or similar.

    3. Plywood and scrap 1x material

    4. PVC adhesive Choose a clear glue with a slow setting time, such as AZEK adhesive.

    5. 1-inch pan-head stainless-steel screws6. 1 5⁄8-inch trim-head stainless-steel screws

    7. Spackling paste rated for outdoor use, such as CrackSHOT, to fill fastener holes.

    8. Fine-grit sandpaper

    9. Latex exterior paint For dark colors use a reflective paint, such as VinylSafe by Sherwin-Williams, so that the PVC won't warp in the heat.