Introduction

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While the smell of mothballs may conjure fond memories of your grandfather's overcoat, it's not really the most attractive scent to wear out in public. Fortunately, there's a more fragrant way to keep moths and insects from making a snack of your best cashmere. The nature aroma of cedar has kept garments hole-free and smelling fresh for centuries. And not only does it repel pests like moths and roaches, it also resists mildew that can ruin fabrics.

To use cedar to its fullest, you should line a whole closet with it. The installation is simple when it's done with tongue-and-groove boards, and the result is both practical and handsome. As This Old House senior technical editor Mark Powers shows on the following pages, all you need is a dray to nail up the wood. Then you'll be able to leave the scent of mothballs in your memory, where it belongs.
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    Tools List

    • studfinder
      Stud finder
    • two-foot level
      2- or 4- foot level
    • pencil compass
      Compass or square
    • torpedo level
      Torpedo level
    • jigsaw
      Jigsaw to trim cedar planks
    • pneumatic brad nailer
      Pneumatic brad nailer and compressor (rents for about $55 a day)
    • caulk gun
      Caulk gun
    • miterbox with saw
      Miter box and handsaw to cut molding
    • coping saw
      Coping saw to fit molding at the corners

    Shopping List

    1. TONGUE-AND-GROOVE CEDAR PLANKING

    Order online or through home centers. Choose lengths that will eliminate the need for joints, or use smaller boards for a patterned look



    2. CEDAR MOLDING

    to cover gaps at the top, bottom, and corners of the closet. Most manufacturers make cove molding to act as crown and to cover gaps at the floor. Optional corner bead will hide seams between walls



    3. 18-GAUGE BRAD-POINT PIN NAILS

    for use with a pneumatic brad nailer



    4.CONSTRUCTION ADHESIVE

    to give additional wall adhesion and keep boards from bowing