Cabinet Decisions

Choosing kitchen cabinets may seem simple, but every detail affects the look and feel of the whole room. Kitchen designer Eileen Thurnauer helped Heidi Smith design her custom cabinets, quizzing her on her shopping, eating, and cooking habits, as well as on style choices. Heidi knew she wanted simple, white 1920s style cabinets. Even so, it took several meetings to hammer out the configuration, storage features, door design, color, and finish.



Here are some of the points they had to consider.



1. PULLS AND KNOBS
Handle design conveys architectural style. Glass knobs dress up a room with a vintage look; metal can appear modern. Wide pulls break up the expanse of large-front drawers.

2. RAILS AND STILES
Thick rails (horizontal frame pieces) and stiles (vertical pieces) suit plain styles like Shaker or Prairie; thinner ones are dressier and look right in Colonial or modern kitchens.

3. INSET VS. OVERLAY DOORS
Inset doors (flush with the frame) have visible hinges and are sleeker than bulky overlay doors. However, full-overlay doors, which mask the entire frame, are very clean and modern.

4. DRAWER FRONTS
Block fronts create a pared-down look; raised-panel fronts are more sculpted and traditional.

5. CABINET PANELS
Flat or recessed panels are simple and sleek; raised panels are traditional and decorative. On glass-front doors, divided lights add texture and are more ornate than single panes, which suit simpler styles.

6. MOLDING
Molding on the inner panel edge (or at cabinet tops) softens the cabinet's lines and adds architectural detail. Lack of molding is starker, which better suits Shaker or Arts and Crafts designs.

For more information on the Lake Forest Dream Kitchen please visit the .

For information on where to find the products and services used in the Dream Kitchen, see the Resource Directory.
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