WHERE TO INSTALL IT

Engineered flooring goes anywhere you'd put solid wood—and some places you couldn't.

In Basements
The moisture that gathers here wreaks havoc on solid wood flooring. Because the veneer layers used for engineered boards crisscross like plywood, the wood's natural tendency to expand and contract in humid areas is reduced. The boards' thinner profile also helps where headroom is at a premium.

During Remodels
The range of thickness options, starting as low as ¼ inch, allow you to finesse transitions between different types of flooring at doorways and stairways that would be awkward or impossible with standard ¾-inch solid flooring. You can also lay engineered flooring over any flat, stable surface, including ceramic tile, sheet vinyl, and existing wood floors.

Over Radiant Heat
Thinner engineered boards transfer heat better than thick solid wood and are more stable. Floating floors are best because they don't need staples or nails that might puncture wires or hot-water tubes. Check with the radiant system's manufacturer before using a foam underlayment, which interferes with heat flow.

Where Not to Use It
While engineered flooring handles swings in moisture better than solid flooring, it has limitations. The wet feet, drips, and soggy towels of a busy bathroom, mixed with steam from a shower, put even stable engineered boards at risk. The same threat hangs over laundry rooms.

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