Care and Maintenance Tips
When it comes to mowing a naturally grown lawn, conventional wisdom still applies. Cut it too short and it doesn't develop the strong, healthy roots it needs to fend off weeds and disease. So find out the best height for the type of turf you're growing. Cool-season grasses, such as Kentucky bluegrass and red fescue, prefer to be between 3 to 4 inches high; while warm-season varieties like Bermuda grass can be maintained at 1 to 1 1/2 inches. Be sure to mow with a mulching attachment or a mulching reel mower and leave the clippings where they fall; they're a natural source of nitrogen as they decompose.

When it comes to conserving water, the good news is that organically-cared-for lawns require less water than chemically treated ones, since the latter needs lots of moisture just to digest all the synthetic fertilizers and pesticides fed to them.

As with any lawn, the key is to water infrequently and deeply, encouraging turf to send down deep roots and making it less susceptible to drought and disease. The best time to water is early morning, since it gives your lawn plenty of time to absorb it and dry off in the sun. Most lawns require about 1 to 2 inches of water per week in summer. Use a rain gauge to measure how much water your lawn's getting; and make sure your sprinkler water isn't being wasted on your driveway or street.

With a little patience and a slight change in thinking, you'll be rewarded with a handsome lawn that's easier on the earth-and on your conscience. "The best thing is that I now have total peace of mind about my yard," says Libby Scancarello. "I want to put a little sign out front that says 'Chemical-free,' so my neighbors can see for themselves just how nice an organic lawn can be."
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