Look for a 'Greener' Grass
You can make your lawn even more sustainable by overseeding it, or completely replacing it, with native or organic grass seed. Las year, DLF Organic (Dlforganic.com) became the first U.S. company to offer USDA-certified organic lawn seed, grown without synthetic pesticides, herbicides, or fertilizers. The company offers three seed mixes: one for sun, one for shade, and one that's mixed with nitrogen-providing clover. Another "green" option is using native turf-grass seed. Since these seeds are familiar with their regional soil conditions and average rain fall, they require less water and are more disease-resistant than non-natives, such as Kentucky bluegrass (from Europe) and St. Augustine grass (from Africa). The best known is buffalograss. a native prairie grass that extremely drought-resistant and, since it's low-growing, only needs to be mowed about once a month. (For more info, visit Pawneebuttesseed.com) Researchers at a few universities throughout the U.S. are exploring the potential of other native grasses for use as turf grass, including blue grama, a warm-season grass thats native to the Great Plains and Southwest, and Idaho bentgrass, which is native to the western United States and shows promise as a sustainable turf in dryer climate.
Ask TOH users about Healthy Home

Contribute to This Story Below